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himalaya
KVRAF
 
4705 posts since 23 Mar, 2006, from pendeLondonmonium

Postby himalaya; Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:21 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

Even if in your sincere judgement the articulation is off, try to even come close to this inferior example on a normal midi keyboard, any. A challange for you.
http://www.electric-himalaya.com
VSTi and hardware synth sound design
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fluffy_little_something
KVRAF
 
11453 posts since 5 Jun, 2012, from Portugal

Postby fluffy_little_something; Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:28 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

By the time one hears the output of a software synth, it's long been converted into a good old-fashioned electrical signal, just like that of a hardware synth.
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Rameses
KVRist
 
131 posts since 9 Mar, 2018, from Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Postby Rameses; Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:55 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

For Rack Units like Roland JV-2080 or E-Mu Morpheus and consorts, definitely worth it. Not to mention newer, expensive ones. Combining that with decent software plugins it can make a really top tier setup.
Analog hardware isn't worth it though, it's quite outdated technology.
For DISCOGRAPHY, see К Ɱ Ԏ Ꮇ Ꮩ Ꭶ Ꭵ Ꮳ
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sin night
KVRian
 
1134 posts since 1 Aug, 2006, from Italy

Postby sin night; Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:19 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

Rameses wrote:Analog hardware isn't worth it though, it's quite outdated technology.


If your music heavily relies on analog sounds, analog hardware may be worth... if you take advantage of cv or you use things that are not emulated (or properly emulated), then it may be worth.
It depends on the music, on the goals and on the impact on the workflow (in comparison to a strictly itb setup).

By the way, it doesn't really matter how old the technology is, also the Roland JV-2080 and the E-Mu Morpheus are outdated now :wink: It's the sound that matters, regardless of the technology.
.jon
KVRAF
 
5477 posts since 8 Jul, 2002, from Helsinki

Postby .jon; Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:38 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

pdxindy wrote:
.jon wrote:But then again, you actually agree- you also find MPE controllers, physical hardware, more immersive, expressive and enjoyable.


In that case, all there is is hardware... no software can even run without the hardware to do it.


Erm? "if MPE controllers aren't software, then everything is hardware"? :dog:
skyscape
KVRist
 
137 posts since 22 Oct, 2005, from Australia

Postby skyscape; Sat Mar 17, 2018 1:43 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

My advice on hardware is not to get too much of it. Maybe one or two nice pieces that will inspire you. I rarely use my actual hardware in tracks because it's just far too inconvenient, but they are just fun to play around on. IMO software eclipsed hardware a while back, if not in raw sound in at least convenience and innovation.
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Rameses
KVRist
 
131 posts since 9 Mar, 2018, from Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Postby Rameses; Sat Mar 17, 2018 3:19 pm Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

sin night wrote:
Rameses wrote:Analog hardware isn't worth it though, it's quite outdated technology.


If your music heavily relies on analog sounds, analog hardware may be worth... if you take advantage of cv or you use things that are not emulated (or properly emulated), then it may be worth.
It depends on the music, on the goals and on the impact on the workflow (in comparison to a strictly itb setup).

By the way, it doesn't really matter how old the technology is, also the Roland JV-2080 and the E-Mu Morpheus are outdated now :wink: It's the sound that matters, regardless of the technology.


How can music heavily rely on analog sound? It all can be emulated in superior systems.

Speaking specifically of those two, they are in fact outdated in relation of newer synthesizers of this type, but they still sound better than many synthesizers which came after them, even than recent ones.
For DISCOGRAPHY, see К Ɱ Ԏ Ꮇ Ꮩ Ꭶ Ꭵ Ꮳ
dellboy
KVRian
 
511 posts since 28 Mar, 2007

Postby dellboy; Sun Mar 18, 2018 12:47 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

Rameses wrote:How can music heavily rely on analog sound? It all can be emulated in superior systems.

Speaking specifically of those two, they are in fact outdated in relation of newer synthesizers of this type, but they still sound better than many synthesizers which came after them, even than recent ones.


I look forward to hearing your recreation of the soundtrack of "BladeRunner" on your superior systems.

When I listen to the original,especially anything within it involving the mighty Yamaha CS80, it still gives me goosebumps.
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DrGonzo
KVRAF
 
2011 posts since 23 Oct, 2000, from A Swede Living in Budapest

Postby DrGonzo; Sun Mar 18, 2018 1:09 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

kanoharuayu wrote:I wonder if I'd really apperciate them or notice the differense from my VST's?


Sure. There is still a difference between hardware and software in sound, but to be honest software is much more mature than five years ago, so it doesn't really matter these days.

I think the biggest question - and I am only speaking for myself here - is workflow.

I am spending most of my daily time in front of a computer screen in one form or another. Sitting down making music in the same environment is utterly boring for me. So I prefer to do music out of the box, but I often sample and record stuff from the computer.

/C
Plughugger Sound Design
80s POP for U-HE REPRO
HARDWARE SAMPLER FANATIC - Akai S1100/S950/Z8 - Casio FZ20m - Emu Emax I - Roland S750/DJ70 - Ensoniq ASR10/EPSm
Winstontaneous
KVRian
 
1328 posts since 14 Feb, 2006, from Berkeley, CA

Postby Winstontaneous; Sun Mar 18, 2018 11:41 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

I had a great time last week pulling out my Tascam 4 track, Lexicon Reflex & Yamaha R1000 FX units, Alesis Ion and Casio MT-65 keyboards, a bass guitar and FX pedals and finishing a tune in 24 hours. Set up some feedback routing with the FX returns and mixed down way too loud to a Marantz cassette recorder.
Limited tracks = the need to commit to sounds and effects settings as you go, and hitting tape hard means not needing much in the way of EQ/compression.

Not something I'd necessarily do for every tune, but a real good time!
lacandon
KVRian
 
517 posts since 31 Aug, 2012

Postby lacandon; Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:18 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

I would say if u need specific character then yes if its just for the music production then no software it's way superior. Sound wise it's disputable the hw always hits converters so it sounds more lively but it's introduce noise sync issues etc. I'VE used hw more like an effect. One of the pluses from a hw device its that it's there for u straight away with computers u always update and update its never ending.MIxture of both is ideal I miss my hw especially the Esx1 the synths not so much because software it's pretty much the same but way more complex. ESX1 had trashy warm sound I can't replicate with anything and it's old school sound always reminds me of my favourite years of electronic music. With nice midi controller I am happy in the box too the touch element always makes me more creative.At the moment I have only Spark drum machine it's a toy but I can come up with crazy patterns with a bit of imagination switch off the quantise and just work in record mode.
I use to work in midi with midi but this way I never get this live randomness.
DJMaytag
KVRist
 
347 posts since 15 Dec, 2012, from Madison, Wiscompton

Postby DJMaytag; Wed Mar 21, 2018 9:49 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

I started out all hardware in the early 90's, because that's all there really was. Some people were still using Atari 1040's and Macs with early (and crude) sequencers, but for the average PC user with a VERY modest computer, you HAD to go hardware for MIDI sequencing. DAW? Forget about it. We're pretty blessed to have the DAW technology at our hands today...

Anyway, like others have mentioned, there was a degree of control and repeatability I really liked with soft synths and digital recording, so I sold off most of my hardware. However, it didn't take long to get stuck in boring loops and not develop as much music as I had with various hardware MIDI sequencers running my gear through a big console and into a 2-track DAT recorder. It's take nearly 17 years to produce as much music as I had in 6 years with all hardware.

I got the bug in the fall of 2015 to get back into hardware, after seeing a HUGE setup of vintage gear and modular synths. I'd heard about Eurorack and was interested in the early Doepfer gear in the late 90's, and that's where I started. A few modules here and there, and a year and a half later, I had a smallish and interesting modular setup. In the past year, I managed to have picked up some bargains on a Roland JX-10 & SH-101, an Oberheim Matrix-100, a Waldorf Pulse, a 70's Moog Minimoog, and some outboard FX (Lexicon & Digitech stuff). Thankfully I kept a Roland TR-606, SCI Prophet-600, and Roland Juno-106 from the mid-90's, as I could never bear to part with those things.

All that plus new gear like the Roland TB-03 and TR-08, makes for a nice setup where I can just go downstairs and not have drag my laptop with me. I can hit start on the drum machines, and just play the keys. No waiting to shut down every app, boot up a DAW, update any VST's, etc before I can start working on an idea. Hardware is the ultimate in instant gratification.
Cubase 8 | ABL2/ReDominator| Phoscyon/Nithonat/Drumazon | SEM V/Jupiter 8V | Nerve/LFO Tool | Sunrizer | Twin2| U-NO-LX/B-101 | Korg KLC

Deep Trance/Retro Acid Trance/Progressive House on Souncloud
Distorted Horizon
KVRian
 
926 posts since 17 Jan, 2017

Postby Distorted Horizon; Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:40 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

sin night wrote:If your music heavily relies on analog sounds, analog hardware may be worth..


Interesting comment.. I think I've never heard music, relaying heavily on analog sounds..
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V0RT3X
KVRAF
 
6916 posts since 3 Jul, 2012, from Canada

Postby V0RT3X; Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:47 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

I'd love to buy a bunch of analog FX processors to run my virtual synthesizers through. (not joking)

I guess in short i'd say yes it's worth it. It's always nice to have options.
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bmanic
KVRAF
 
7965 posts since 3 Feb, 2003, from Finland, Espoo

Postby bmanic; Wed Mar 21, 2018 11:05 am Re: Is it worth it to get a bunch of hardware? (coming from software only)

dellboy wrote:
Rameses wrote:How can music heavily rely on analog sound? It all can be emulated in superior systems.

Speaking specifically of those two, they are in fact outdated in relation of newer synthesizers of this type, but they still sound better than many synthesizers which came after them, even than recent ones.


I look forward to hearing your recreation of the soundtrack of "BladeRunner" on your superior systems.

When I listen to the original,especially anything within it involving the mighty Yamaha CS80, it still gives me goosebumps.


.. yeah that soundtrack was surely the cause of the hardware used. No part of the sound came from the fact that talented people worked on it and made it sound good with the tools they had. No.. it was all due to the hardware.
"I'm not trying to be anyone's savior. I'm just trying to think about the future and not be sad." - Elon Musk, TED talk April 2017
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