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how to learn chords? noob

Chords, scales, harmony, melody, etc.

Moderator: Moderators (Main)

manducator
KVRAF
 
1639 posts since 10 Feb, 2007

Postby manducator; Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:56 am

Take a look at this:

http://www.musictheory.net/

And here is a downloadable version:

http://classic.musictheory.net/

It even has a scheme for writing chord progressions. And it's free.
User avatar
codec_spurt
KVRAF
 
3462 posts since 20 Sep, 2005

Postby codec_spurt; Mon Jan 21, 2013 11:10 am

trewq wrote:Mel Bay books.

Seriously. If you are not familiar with it, check it on Wikipedia.



I got a few of Mel's books when I was starting out. But I don't blame him ;-).


Really good actually - learned a lot. Are the books still around?
Highly recommended.



I posted elsewhere on KVR but just visit http://jguitar.com/ - you can learn about chords you made up and what name/key they are. You can tune your guitar/bass including alternative tunings. You can find scales that go with certain chords. You can look up a name of a chord and find alternative inversions.

It really is a one stop shop for the beginner guitarist. I wish I had had it when starting out. Then again...


;-)
You'll be pleased to know, I'm knocking it all on the head.
trewq
KVRist
 
179 posts since 23 Nov, 2008

Postby trewq; Mon Jan 21, 2013 3:57 pm

codec_spurt wrote:
trewq wrote:Mel Bay books.

Seriously. If you are not familiar with it, check it on Wikipedia.



I got a few of Mel's books when I was starting out. But I don't blame him ;-).


Really good actually - learned a lot. Are the books still around?
Highly recommended.



I posted elsewhere on KVR but just visit http://jguitar.com/ - you can learn about chords you made up and what name/key they are. You can tune your guitar/bass including alternative tunings. You can find scales that go with certain chords. You can look up a name of a chord and find alternative inversions.

It really is a one stop shop for the beginner guitarist. I wish I had had it when starting out. Then again...


;-)


That Mel Bay chord encyclopedia sold alot back in the day. I never heard of it until my girlfriend in high school bought it for me - back when I only had one thing on my mind.
Make music, not war.
jancivil
KVRAF
 
9478 posts since 20 Oct, 2007

Postby jancivil; Tue Jan 22, 2013 2:30 am

lingyai wrote:Not a substitute, but a supplement

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... _1BgtA_lvo
Bullshit. This is geared for avoidance of musical thought, for people that for some perverse reason are in a hurry or allergic to the work involved of approaching music with their own thought. Anyway as per the OP that is asking about a primer, this will be a crutch before the first steps are taken.

If one needs a program to guess their chord changes, perhaps they aren't well suited temperamentally to the task of writing music.
I said "work" above, but the real interest in how music works would prefigure that this kind of thing is a lot of fun and rewarding per se. If it isn't, I can only guess 'in a hurry' hence a drive to find a way out of doing it yourself.

There is surely a market for this kind of thing today though.
b4serenity
KVRist
 
216 posts since 1 Oct, 2010

Postby b4serenity; Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:45 am

jancivil wrote:
lingyai wrote:Not a substitute, but a supplement

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... _1BgtA_lvo
Bullshit. This is geared for avoidance of musical thought, for people that for some perverse reason are in a hurry or allergic to the work involved of approaching music with their own thought. Anyway as per the OP that is asking about a primer, this will be a crutch before the first steps are taken.

If one needs a program to guess their chord changes, perhaps they aren't well suited temperamentally to the task of writing music.
I said "work" above, but the real interest in how music works would prefigure that this kind of thing is a lot of fun and rewarding per se. If it isn't, I can only guess 'in a hurry' hence a drive to find a way out of doing it yourself.

There is surely a market for this kind of thing today though.


Hmmm, makes me want to check it out! I look at things now (as I get older) in a way that I can't do everything; I write my own songs but not with any real music theory other than what I learned from HS band; I play what sounds good to me. I look at it like this...I can't be an expert at everything or even study / become very proficient at everything I want to do in life; learn music theory, guitar, bass, DAW, effects, synth programming, tennis, homebrewing, motorcycle riding, studying the bible, making wine etc. etc. I only have so much time to do all these things!

What if you found out that your favorite song ever was written by a songwriter that didn't know much about music theory...would you not like it anymore? I think the final result (if it's legal) is what's important.YMMV. :wink:
John
"B4serenity"
Nanakai
KVRian
 
592 posts since 3 Oct, 2011

Postby Nanakai; Tue Jan 22, 2013 7:07 am

b4serenity wrote:
jancivil wrote:
[anger]


...

I play what sounds good to me.

...


What if you found out that your favorite song ever was written by a songwriter that didn't know much about music theory...would you not like it anymore? I think the final result (if it's legal) is what's important.YMMV. :wink:


But I think this is the point. If you play what sounds good to you, then why would you need a program to tell you what to play?
b4serenity
KVRist
 
216 posts since 1 Oct, 2010

Postby b4serenity; Tue Jan 22, 2013 8:31 am

Well it would be an easy way for me to add color (variations of chords) that I might not use normally. Kind of like collaborating with a virtual songwriting partner/piano player. I wish I could become better at all the things in my list above, but I don't want to give up even one of them so I have to spread my time around to have some semblance of a balanced life. I still spend most of my time on my songs but I can't finish things from fear of judgement (I really have to get over that!) or not enough time before the next big idea comes along!
John
"B4serenity"
VitaminD
Pick Me Pick me!
 
7702 posts since 11 Mar, 2002, from a state of confusion

Postby VitaminD; Tue Jan 22, 2013 5:25 pm

JumpingJackFlash wrote:
Perricone wrote:How do you know what chords can be played in a certain scale?


Check out my Introduction to Music Theory.

To put it simply, you build chords using the notes of the key. So, in C major you have C,D,E,F,G,A and B to play with; no sharps of flats.

Chords are usually constructed in thirds; that means there is a third between each note. (C to D is a second, C to E is a third for example).

So, stacking thirds in this way on each note of the scale gives you:
C,E,G
D,F,A
E,G,B
F,A,C
G,B,D
A,C,E
B,D,F

In any major key; chords I, IV and V are major chords. Chords ii, iii and vi are minor, and chord vii is diminished.

If I was in G major for example, I have an F#, so that means I use D,F#,A and B,D,F# (instead of D,F,A and B,D,F)
If I was in F major, I have a Bb so I use G,Bb,D and Bb,D,F.
And so on.



Your post really explains a few things I never understood and ties some other things I did together. THANK YOU!
"Use the talents you possess, for the woods would be very silent if no birds sang except the best." - Henry Van Dyke
seacouch
KVRist
 
88 posts since 29 Mar, 2009

Postby seacouch; Wed Jan 23, 2013 1:26 pm

Nanakai wrote:
jancivil wrote:
[anger]





Nicely summarized. :hihi:
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