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Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Anything about MUSIC but doesn't fit into the forums above.

Moderator: Moderators (Main)

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nix808
KVRAF
 
2979 posts since 22 Jul, 2006, from Melbourne, Australia

Postby nix808; Sun Jan 12, 2014 4:25 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

OK- thanks.
I have tried that, but must never have used heavy enough pots-coz they always fry on me. Maybe I will try this again some day.

I guess the motor in case is just the kind you would get in a Tamiya model, maybe taking 3 volts usually.

I can't see the image here, nor copy it.
___^O** *where is my less or greater than comparator___^O** *
http://www.phonicsaudio.com --- https://soundcloud.com/nix808/tracks
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aciddose
KVRAF
 
9122 posts since 7 Dec, 2004, from Vancouver, Canada

Postby aciddose; Sun Jan 12, 2014 5:29 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Yeah watch out that you use the proper rated pot. You need to be aware of how many amperes the motor can draw at maximum, usually during start up. Then you need to figure out which voltages you'll be driving it with and the wattage you need for your pot.

If the motor requires variable resistance you'll probably need a 5-watt wire-wound for reasonable size motors, minimally. If it works with only variable voltage you can drive it from a power transistor instead and use a small-signal buffer to buffer the voltage from the pot at some low current like 10ma. So, in other words build a darlington with a small-signal input and a power transistor output.
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vurt
addled muppet weed
 
33860 posts since 25 Jan, 2003, from through the looking glass

Postby vurt; Sun Jan 12, 2014 5:44 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Jedinhopy wrote:The motor engine should be silent.

well thats never gonna happen, the motion of any moving parts in contact with other parts will produce friction nd therefore some noise. you can however attain "quiet". then keep the motor as far away as possiblr from the recordind device.


but i came here mainly to ask a question i know im going to regret, because you will probably answer...


my question is "why do you want to do this?"
is it somethng you actually require or is it something you want to find if its at all possible.
and can you define "forever" with a little more clarity, even the universe itself for example will eventually suffer from decay and eventually fall silent.
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nix808
KVRAF
 
2979 posts since 22 Jul, 2006, from Melbourne, Australia

Postby nix808; Sun Jan 12, 2014 6:49 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Thanks a bundle AD, I have filed that post.
___^O** *where is my less or greater than comparator___^O** *
http://www.phonicsaudio.com --- https://soundcloud.com/nix808/tracks
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Sendy
KVRAF
 
4516 posts since 20 Jul, 2010

Postby Sendy; Sun Jan 12, 2014 6:53 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

vurt wrote:even the universe itself for example will eventually suffer from decay and eventually fall silent.


Doesn't matter to me, I'll be sipping margaritas under a palm tree in the Bahamas by the time that happens.

Wait...
http://sendy.bandcamp.com/releases < My new album at Bandcamp!
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vurt
addled muppet weed
 
33860 posts since 25 Jan, 2003, from through the looking glass

Postby vurt; Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:02 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Sendy wrote:
vurt wrote:even the universe itself for example will eventually suffer from decay and eventually fall silent.


Doesn't matter to me, I'll be sipping margaritas under a palm tree in the Bahamas by the time that happens.

Wait...



perhaps you will, but youll be doing it silently ;)
Doug1978
KVRAF
 
1522 posts since 19 Jun, 2011, from Sendai, Japan

Postby Doug1978; Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:06 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

vurt wrote:even the universe itself for example will eventually suffer from decay and eventually fall silent.


Or will it?

And if it's an infinite decay (like on my busted Casio PSS-480 keyboard) - or even a twist in the fabric of space where time becomes a loop... - then it'll never be silent.

NEVER!!!!


NEVER!!!!

NEVER!!!!
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Tricky-Loops
KVRAF
 
8690 posts since 12 Mar, 2012, from South Bavaria - near the alps... :-)

Postby Tricky-Loops; Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:19 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

ThomasHelzle
KVRAF
 
3029 posts since 9 Dec, 2008, from Berlin

Postby ThomasHelzle; Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:23 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/mus ... 2xpqs.html

Replace the piano strings with a cymbal? ;-)

Cheers,

Tom
Jedinhopy
KVRist
 
438 posts since 20 May, 2010, from Home

Postby Jedinhopy; Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:23 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

vurt wrote:
Jedinhopy wrote:The motor engine should be silent.
Well that's never gonna happen, the motion of any moving parts in contact with other parts will produce friction and therefore some noise. you can however attain "quiet". then keep the motor as far away as possible from the recording device.
I don't think noise reduction software will remove the motor engine hum because the pitch is unstable and changes it's frequency based on how much energy is left in the battery.
If i push it toward a object. The motor engine must work harder and so the pitch changes again.
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vurt
addled muppet weed
 
33860 posts since 25 Jan, 2003, from through the looking glass

Postby vurt; Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:03 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Jedinhopy wrote:
vurt wrote:
Jedinhopy wrote:The motor engine should be silent.
Well that's never gonna happen, the motion of any moving parts in contact with other parts will produce friction and therefore some noise. you can however attain "quiet". then keep the motor as far away as possible from the recording device.
I don't think noise reduction software will remove the motor engine hum because the pitch is unstable and changes it's frequency based on how much energy is left in the battery.
If i push it toward a object. The motor engine must work harder and so the pitch changes again.




who said anything about noise reduction software?
rockstar_not
KVRAF
 
4826 posts since 10 Aug, 2004, from Colorado Springs

Postby rockstar_not; Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:06 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

JJBiener wrote: The problem is that noise will not cause anything particularly metal plate to resonate. In order for something to resonate, you must subject it to a repeating waveform.
.


This is not quite right. If it were, we would have almost no music whatsoever.

A metal plate will absolutely resonate when subjected to random vibrations - it will vibrate at it's natural bending mode frequencies. This is why bells resonate with tonal response, even though they are struck by an impulse which has no single frequency content, but rather very broad frequency content. This is why stringed instruments respond with tonal response, when subjected to plucks, which are again like impulses, with no specific singular frequency content.

An analogy to perhaps what the OP is looking for is a shaker used for modal analysis of physical objects. Something like this: http://www.modalshop.com/excitation/25- ... ter?ID=249 These devices are connected to physical objects, then various types of vibration patterns are introduced, and using accelerometers on the device, one can determine the resonant frequencies of the object, as well as the mode shapes, or vibration patterns that result.

I used to do this for a living, for what it's worth.

As to what the OP is asking for, one could make a 'bow' from a belt with similar friction properties as rosin'ed horsehair that is in a violin bow, and drive it at a constant speed with a motor and hold it to the edge of the cymbal.

That's a whole bunch of work.

What could probably work in synthesis is to multi-sample a 'fingernail scratched cymbal', break the samples into small chunks and then use a granular synthesis technique for the 'never ending cymbal' sound.
Jedinhopy
KVRist
 
438 posts since 20 May, 2010, from Home

Postby Jedinhopy; Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:08 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Or white noise convolution reverb where the cymbal is the impulse response.
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Tricky-Loops
KVRAF
 
8690 posts since 12 Mar, 2012, from South Bavaria - near the alps... :-)

Postby Tricky-Loops; Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:28 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Connect a cymbal with a guitar amplifier...
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farlukar
KVRAF
 
5548 posts since 18 Apr, 2004

Postby farlukar; Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:29 am Re: Which physical object sends random vibrations?

Jedinhopy wrote:Or white noise convolution reverb where the cymbal is the impulse response.
:uhuhuh: there's no physical object involved in that.
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