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How High Do You Pass?

How to do this, that and the other. Share, learn, teach. How did X do that? How can I sound like Y?

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How High Do You Pass?

I Don't
7
25%
20Hz
2
7%
30Hz
9
32%
40Hz
2
7%
>40Hz
8
29%
 
Total votes : 28
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KVRAF
 
4247 posts since 20 Jul, 2010
 

Postby Sendy; Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:40 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

At college we were taught the dangers of excessive highpassing. Namely - a complete lack of a sense of realness and power. Sounds are generally formed from the bottom up, that's why a lowpass filter sounds more natural than a highpass filter. Overhighpassing can make things harsh and "blasty". Which is a pretty good description of how I hear a lot of badly mixed modern music.

That said, I'll highpass anything that contains DC offset, and anything that conflicts with the bass and kick. The trick is knowing when and how much, and that's mostly something you have to learn for yourself. Pads can be a real culprit for low end energy but on the other hand, if you want them to be warm - you need some of those lows there. It's all a balancing act.

One trick I like to use is to only highpass some things when the bass is playing. For example, in a section where the pad is playing without the bass, I'll remove the highpass, then activate it when the bass hits. It's almost like the bass is barging into the low end of the pad and knocking it out of the way :hihi:
Last edited by Sendy on Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
http://sendy.bandcamp.com/releases < My new album at Bandcamp!
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KVRAF
 
8853 posts since 12 Mar, 2012, from South Bavaria - near the alps... :-)

Postby Tricky-Loops; Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:42 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

Turello wrote:@Tricky: you can Hipass Master until 40hz why under you can't ear and also over 16.000hz... I imagine You with 2 mega Subwoofer but I'm sure You deceive your ears..! As Rapper Do!!! ah ah ah :-D
40 hz is too high IMO, and if you highpass at 16.000 Hz...well, you'll hear nothing anymore... :P

(And, no, I'm not a rapper but it's true that I love - intelligent !- hiphop except all this gangsta aggro stuff...)
KVRist
 
412 posts since 7 Mar, 2009, from MerseySide/Stockholm

Postby TIMT; Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:43 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

Pretty much never apart from the final master output which is usually like 20-30hz with equality.but i try to get the sounds and arrangement as close as possible so no highpassing is necessary.keep that phase rotation to a minimum which is still pretty audible at even 30hz hence why i try to avoid it but sometimes it isn´t possible






TIMT
It's all about the chef not about the kitchen
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KVRian
 
1077 posts since 6 Jul, 2012

Postby Turello; Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:47 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

@Tricky: 16.000Hz for loPass... Ulgly Gangsta!!! ahahahaha!!!

Serious: take care your ears! ;-)
KVRist
 
102 posts since 29 Jun, 2012

Postby GFunk; Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:38 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

Re: the 2buss. If nessesary I will hp at @ 30 hz with 12db/oct slope. Other times even lower with a 6 db oct slope. Sometimes just a low shelf is all that's needed.
Cubase user, House producer.

http://soundcloud.com/gavin-jackson
KVRist
 
276 posts since 9 Aug, 2004

Postby Samplecraze; Wed Mar 26, 2014 3:41 am Re: How High Do You Pass?

Cleaning is the first and foremost step when mixing. Getting rid of redundant frequencies is not as easy as HP your mix at some magic frequency.

The best approach, and particularly with low end energies, is to use a spectrum analyser (as your ears are not going to hear much at sub-sonic levels), and filter the highest energy values that you cannot hear. We do this for two reasons: to prevent compressor bei9ng triggered by high energy values, and to create space for other frequencies.
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KVRian
 
1262 posts since 28 Oct, 2007, from michigan

Postby Mister Natural; Thu Mar 27, 2014 9:54 am Re: How High Do You Pass?

on the master, I use the "brick-walls" in Ozone5 set at 38cycles and 16.5k

sounds fantastic
an expert on what it feels like to be me
& you are who you google

https://soundcloud.com/mrnatural-1/tracks
KVRist
 
41 posts since 15 Mar, 2013, from United States

Postby sharke; Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:19 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

It totally depends on the instrument, and don't forget that the slope is a factor as well. You also have to remember that a filter doesn't totally remove everything below the cutoff, it just attenuates it to the degree specified by the slope. Don't get hung up on figures, just do what sounds right. I've high passed bass parts as high as 150-200Hz because there was just too much boomy low end in them. The sub-50Hz frequencies are still there, they are just attenuated to a more sensible level.

As for other instruments, if it's quite a busy mix with lots of potential clashing and masking, what I'll do is high pass until the part just starts to sound too thin, then I'll back off a bit. In some cases, it's perfectly alright to thin a part out to the point where it sounds like crap when soloed. I've had rhodes parts high passed up to 500Hz before, because they were muddying things up too much. Listen to Patrice Rushen's "Forget Me Nots" - that rhodes has had a lot removed to make it sit so unobtrusively in the mix. If it was a bigger part of the arrangement they would have probably gone a lot easier on the filter.

And then there's high passing for reverb. I'll cut as high as 500-600Hz on a reverb send, and maybe around low pass around 10K, for a much cleaner sound which doesn't muddy the mix.
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KVRAF
 
2764 posts since 13 Jan, 2005, from Deutschland

Postby murnau; Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:48 pm Re: How High Do You Pass?

Samplecraze wrote:Cleaning is the first and foremost step when mixing. Getting rid of redundant frequencies is not as easy as HP your mix at some magic frequency.

The best approach, and particularly with low end energies, is to use a spectrum analyser (as your ears are not going to hear much at sub-sonic levels), and filter the highest energy values that you cannot hear. We do this for two reasons: to prevent compressor bei9ng triggered by high energy values, and to create space for other frequencies.


that.
“Our virtues and our failings are inseparable, like force and matter. When they separate, man is no more” ― Nikola Tesla
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KVRist
 
275 posts since 30 May, 2003, from Milan
    

Postby Hermetech Mastering; Sat Mar 29, 2014 12:24 am Re: How High Do You Pass?

In mastering it completely depends on the track. Sometimes no high passing, sometimes 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 etc. As long as you are doing more good than harm to the sound, just go with what sounds the best.
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