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BassMake
KVRist
 
68 posts since 28 Nov, 2013, from The Netherlands

Postby BassMake; Sun Feb 25, 2018 1:29 am Mr sid stab sound

Hi all,

I was wondering if there is someone who can help recreate this stab sound that's played at the 0:21 marker? I'm thinking myself on a detunes saw stab but can't really seem to recreate it.

https://soundcloud.com/mr-sid/sets/mr-s ... zard-miami
<3
BassMake
KVRist
 
68 posts since 28 Nov, 2013, from The Netherlands

Postby BassMake; Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:29 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

bumb
<3
jmalge
KVRist
 
30 posts since 31 Jul, 2016

Postby jmalge; Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:28 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

It's an FM patch, built similar to an FM "donk" bass, but obviously a couple octaves higher. To get you started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk233DfKTe8

In the video, he uses a triangle to modulate a sine in a 2:1 ratio, with a sub and a filter. In your case, the carrier and modulator are both sines, ratio is 1:1 (both carrier and modulator same octave), and you may not need the filter or the sub.
BassMake
KVRist
 
68 posts since 28 Nov, 2013, from The Netherlands

Postby BassMake; Mon Apr 23, 2018 1:46 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

jmalge wrote:It's an FM patch, built similar to an FM "donk" bass, but obviously a couple octaves higher. To get you started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk233DfKTe8

In the video, he uses a triangle to modulate a sine in a 2:1 ratio, with a sub and a filter. In your case, the carrier and modulator are both sines, ratio is 1:1 (both carrier and modulator same octave), and you may not need the filter or the sub.



Thank you for your suggestion! but can really work it out can you help me maybe with a preset? When ever i use a sine as the carrier it doenst even come close at all....
<3
jmalge
KVRist
 
30 posts since 31 Jul, 2016

Postby jmalge; Tue Apr 24, 2018 4:27 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

So after listening again, it sounds like there's some pitch modulation and some distortion (probably a wave shaper) going on on the front side of the attack. The body of the pluck is definitely FM. Also it's likely layered to thicken it up, and of course it's been mastered so at the very least EQ/compression/limiting was applied as well.

If you have VPS Avenger, here's a patch you can analyze that does all of the above, except I used 5 voices of unison rather than layering, but it sounds pretty close.
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dreizer123
KVRer
 
5 posts since 24 Apr, 2018

Postby dreizer123; Tue Apr 24, 2018 4:28 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

jmalge wrote:It's an FM patch, built similar to an FM "donk" bass, but obviously a couple octaves higher. To get you started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk233DfKTe8

In the video, he uses a triangle to modulate a sine in a 2:1 ratio, with a sub and a filter. In your case, the carrier and modulator are both sines, ratio is 1:1 (both carrier and modulator same octave), and you may not need the filter or the sub.



When you say "ratio" what do you mean ? where can i visibly see it in serum and what does it do?

thanks
jmalge
KVRist
 
30 posts since 31 Jul, 2016

Postby jmalge; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:27 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

dreizer123 wrote:
When you say "ratio" what do you mean ? where can i visibly see it in serum and what does it do?

thanks


Ratio refers to the modulator frequency vs. the carrier frequency. A 2:1 M:C ratio means the modulator is twice the frequency of the carrier, or in other words 1 octave higher. (I don't know if there's a convention around which one goes first - you might see people referring to a C:M ratio instead, and if so it would be 1:2. I've seen it both ways and prefer M:C)

In Serum, you would see the M:C ratio by examining the relative pitches of OSC A and OSC B. In the video I linked, OSC B (he's using B as the modulator) is an octave higher than OSC A (the carrier), so the M:C ratio is 2:1.

As for what it does, it changes the harmonic content of the carrier. Higher ratios usually result in more higher frequency harmonics with a lower energy level proportional to the fundamental, giving the overall sound a "metallic" character. Lower ratios can give more "weight". All of this also depends on how and by how much you modulate the modulator and carrier themselves.

Entire books have been written on FM synthesis. It's a very deep rabbit hole. If nothing I wrote made any sense to you, then start by googling around for tutorials on FM synthesis, and experiment with it on the synths you have.
BassMake
KVRist
 
68 posts since 28 Nov, 2013, from The Netherlands

Postby BassMake; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:29 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

jmalge wrote:So after listening again, it sounds like there's some pitch modulation and some distortion (probably a wave shaper) going on on the front side of the attack. The body of the pluck is definitely FM. Also it's likely layered to thicken it up, and of course it's been mastered so at the very least EQ/compression/limiting was applied as well.

If you have VPS Avenger, here's a patch you can analyze that does all of the above, except I used 5 voices of unison rather than layering, but it sounds pretty close.

Sadly i dont have VPS Avenger but will install the demo to have a look how its sounds. Thank you very very much. Ps can you recommend Avenger?
<3
dreizer123
KVRer
 
5 posts since 24 Apr, 2018

Postby dreizer123; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:40 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

jmalge wrote:
dreizer123 wrote:
When you say "ratio" what do you mean ? where can i visibly see it in serum and what does it do?

thanks


Ratio refers to the modulator frequency vs. the carrier frequency. A 2:1 M:C ratio means the modulator is twice the frequency of the carrier, or in other words 1 octave higher. (I don't know if there's a convention around which one goes first - you might see people referring to a C:M ratio instead, and if so it would be 1:2. I've seen it both ways and prefer M:C)

In Serum, you would see the M:C ratio by examining the relative pitches of OSC A and OSC B. In the video I linked, OSC B (he's using B as the modulator) is an octave higher than OSC A (the carrier), so the M:C ratio is 2:1.

As for what it does, it changes the harmonic content of the carrier. Higher ratios usually result in more higher frequency harmonics with a lower energy level proportional to the fundamental, giving the overall sound a "metallic" character. Lower ratios can give more "weight". All of this also depends on how and by how much you modulate the modulator and carrier themselves.

Entire books have been written on FM synthesis. It's a very deep rabbit hole. If nothing I wrote made any sense to you, then start by googling around for tutorials on FM synthesis, and experiment with it on the synths you have.



Thank you ! I have understood what you meant! Thanks alot
jmalge
KVRist
 
30 posts since 31 Jul, 2016

Postby jmalge; Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:14 am Re: Mr sid stab sound

BassMake wrote:Ps can you recommend Avenger?



I can recommend it for me :D

Only you will know if it's right for you.

It's a big complicated synth with a big complicated feature set. I happen to like the immense power it has and don't mind dealing with complexity. In fact, that kind of complexity is fun to me.
BassMake
KVRist
 
68 posts since 28 Nov, 2013, from The Netherlands

Postby BassMake; Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:59 pm Re: Mr sid stab sound

jmalge wrote:So after listening again, it sounds like there's some pitch modulation and some distortion (probably a wave shaper) going on on the front side of the attack. The body of the pluck is definitely FM. Also it's likely layered to thicken it up, and of course it's been mastered so at the very least EQ/compression/limiting was applied as well.

If you have VPS Avenger, here's a patch you can analyze that does all of the above, except I used 5 voices of unison rather than layering, but it sounds pretty close.



Finnaly got Avenger to work (what a hassle) but now the demo version isnt the newest update of the plugin .... GREAT...... Ill try again with the serum tutorial (maybe FM8)
<3

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