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evilantal
KVRian
 
738 posts since 13 Mar, 2008, from Arnhem, Netherlands

Postby evilantal; Tue Mar 20, 2018 12:52 am bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

Out of the Plugin Alliance console emulations, I only have the bx_console E and realy like the vibe of it.

I'm wondering though, what would be the typical applications of the three consoles E, G and N?
Would one be more suited to specific kinds of source material?
Demo work: https://soundcloud.com/antaln
My post/prog rock band: http://www.sylvium.com
Music for media: http://www.myendlessy.com
soundmodel
KVRian
 
606 posts since 28 May, 2010, from Finland

Postby soundmodel; Tue Mar 20, 2018 2:52 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

I can't recognize the differences in the compressors yet, but with regards to EQ and "drive",

E is a rough and aggressive desk.
G is a smoother and more clinical desk.
N is a round and very smooth desk.

There's nothing preventing you from doing a mix on any of these, but those general characteristics may guide you on how to choose what suits.

So e.g. you could start with E on drums and bass, but move onto G or N if that doesn't work out as you like it.
You could start with N or G for synths and ambient stuff, but move down to E if those don't work out.

Best to just familiarize yourself with their sonic differences. They also have obvious technical differences, e.g. in the bandwidths of the EQ bands.

Nothing preventing you from using just a single one of them always. For example my Console 1 has only the SSL 4000 (E) emu, but it doesn't stop me doing mixes. Just that sometimes I find that it's a bit too rough in the EQ, so I might have to supplement it with other equalizers.

I tend to use tools (Duende and Reason's mixer) that have switches for switching between SSL G/E, so I usually just start with either and then push the switch if it doesn't sound as I like it and often the other mode will work out.

Between G and N it's probably more of a matter of taste, whether one prefers the "SSL sound" or the "Neve sound".
simon.a.billington
KVRian
 
1240 posts since 12 Nov, 2014

Postby simon.a.billington; Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:23 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

I like N for styles like Jazz, R&B, Soul, Downtempo. E works for R&B and Soul too as well as a more classic Rock sound. G is also good for Rock, Dance and probably some things I’m forgetting.

This is just a personal taste thing though, you can give anything a go with any strip you want really. Experiment. As long as the mix skills are there I’m any on of th m can do a good enough job on pretty much anything.
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evilantal
KVRian
 
738 posts since 13 Mar, 2008, from Arnhem, Netherlands

Postby evilantal; Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:57 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

Thanks both.

That's some pretty solid information. Very helpful!
Demo work: https://soundcloud.com/antaln
My post/prog rock band: http://www.sylvium.com
Music for media: http://www.myendlessy.com
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sqigls
KVRAF
 
2889 posts since 24 Dec, 2004, from Melbourne, Australia

Postby sqigls; Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:24 pm Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

i bought console first, which became N, I loved it so much. At the time i was working a lot on reggae, mostly live.
soundmodel's assessment is pretty spot-on, console N is very round and smooth, very warm. Perfect for roots rock reggae ;)

When console E was released, i was working on more tight tech/house sounds, and the low-end on it was so solid, console N just couldn't match it for the tighter tech styles, i think partly due to the high-pass filter :hihi:
I basically ended up selling console N because i didn't use it anymore.

and although I do sometimes miss that warm Neve sound, i've always been more of an SSL kinda guy.
I'm not so interested in console G though, the compressor is useful, but even the brown EQ in console E never really gets used. Probably more suited to rock :P

but seriously, I'm not convinced that any tool comes down to genre, it's more just taste really.
That said, the E has a very tight and surgical low end which lends itself well to any source material that demands a bit more precision in those frequencies.
MogwaiBoy
KVRAF
 
2424 posts since 26 Nov, 2015, from Way Downunder

Postby MogwaiBoy; Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:03 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

How do you actually use them - do you 1 instance on every channel? Is there channel and bus versions of the plugin? Without adding any EQ or comp does it do any subtle "fairydust" kinda stuff just being there? Sorry for the rookie questions...
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sqigls
KVRAF
 
2889 posts since 24 Dec, 2004, from Melbourne, Australia

Postby sqigls; Sat Mar 24, 2018 4:05 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

fairydust yes.

only one version

sometimes i put them on every channel, sometimes on first insert, sometimes on last, sometimes i only use the HP/LP filters.
Sometimes I only use the harmonic distortion, sometimes they just sit there in their initialised state.
I think they sound good in conjunction with Slate Virtual Channel too.
They alter the stereo spread and add a little bit of pseudo-analog magic.
maybe too subtle for some people, using them like that, but just put one on every channel, then use the Random All button and shuffle through some virtual desks... it can change the vibe of the track.

I'm not entirely sure exactly what components and stages console emulates, but using console E with the Slate VCC in SSL mode on every channel, then randomising the desk, it definitely sounds very SSL to me. or console N with the VCC Neve algo, same, some magic without doing anything else to the mix. Until i can afford an actual SSL desk, i guess it's the closest I'm gonna get :)


I should also add... it's probably better to add them to everything before you start mixing. Sometimes even just having them there in their initialised state kind negates the need for any EQ or compression. If you take the time and find the right channel combo for each instrument, i'm sure the mix will be perceived as at least a bit more 'expensive'. Probably also a good idea to save presets for different types of instruments too, cos some sound sources sound a bit better through particular channel algorithms. I haven't really taken proper note of this phenomena yet though sorry.
simon.a.billington
KVRian
 
1240 posts since 12 Nov, 2014

Postby simon.a.billington; Wed Apr 04, 2018 2:17 am Re: bx_console E vs G vs N. Typical applications?

MogwaiBoy wrote:How do you actually use them - do you 1 instance on every channel? Is there channel and bus versions of the plugin? Without adding any EQ or comp does it do any subtle "fairydust" kinda stuff just being there? Sorry for the rookie questions...


For a while I've been treating Logic's Summing Stack's like a track composite, which effectively resolves to acting like a desk channel for me. From there everything goes to a submit before it hits the master. Which is a technique I brought over with me from the analogue days.

The composite tracks is where I put my channel strips, although it doesn't necessarily have to be the same type. I could use different types on different groups of tracks. That's how I use them anyway. Not on every track instance.

I have been noticing lately, that quite a few mixers adopt this "composite" approach, they just straight out use auxes and call them stems or submixes. However, I also have submixes, but they can probably equate to folks who do things like All Drums and All Music.

Odd how people can come to pretty much the same approach or conclusion, but take their own journey to get there.

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