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elkanah77
KVRist
 
134 posts since 3 Jul, 2016, from Norway

Postby elkanah77; Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:58 am Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

It was good enough for Erasure when they toured their debut album Wonderland in the mid 80s so if you crave that 80s drum machine sound you'd better check out this very nice machine.
I still use mine both live and in the studio and here I show you why:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIwetbScAtw
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Bombadil
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1622 posts since 31 Aug, 2013, from The Schwarzwald of My Mind

Postby Bombadil; Thu Apr 19, 2018 6:28 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

80's best drum machine? :lol:

I had one. It tided me over until I got a Roland R-5. IMO, Yamaha's best drum machine from that era was the RX-5. Roland's was the R-70.
“Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand.”


Kurt Vonnegut
elkanah77
KVRist
 
134 posts since 3 Jul, 2016, from Norway

Postby elkanah77; Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:52 pm Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

Bombadil wrote:80's best drum machine? :lol:

I had one. It tided me over until I got a Roland R-5. IMO, Yamaha's best drum machine from that era was the RX-5. Roland's was the R-70.


Sure, the RX5 is more advanced. Sometimes I just want the raw sound going easy and fast and there the RX11 excels. Both great though. I think the Roland TR-626 is the greatest Roland of the 80s.
lfm
KVRAF
 
4464 posts since 22 Jan, 2005, from Sweden

Postby lfm; Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:00 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

I remember longing for affording one of those, back then.
But there was a sudden drop in price on Roland 909, 30% cheaper than Yamaha.
Always liked cymbals in the Yamaha better, the right sizzle kind of.
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Bombadil
KVRAF
 
1622 posts since 31 Aug, 2013, from The Schwarzwald of My Mind

Postby Bombadil; Sat Apr 21, 2018 4:00 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

elkanah77 wrote:
Bombadil wrote:80's best drum machine? :lol:

I had one. It tided me over until I got a Roland R-5. IMO, Yamaha's best drum machine from that era was the RX-5. Roland's was the R-70.


Sure, the RX5 is more advanced. Sometimes I just want the raw sound going easy and fast and there the RX11 excels. Both great though. I think the Roland TR-626 is the greatest Roland of the 80s.


I guess it depends on the motivation. I always wanted a drum machine that would emulate real drums as closely as possible. Throw a bit of reverb on the snare, keep the drums down in the mix, and if I pretended hard enough, I could almost believe they were real. Never quite, though. If you're doing electronica or other modern forms of music, then the artificiality is a plus, not a minus. I think the first one I used was a TR-606, but I can't be sure. The RX-5 was my favourite to work with, though.
I'm just glad that there are now sample-based drum programs that actually sound authentic.
“Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand.”


Kurt Vonnegut
elkanah77
KVRist
 
134 posts since 3 Jul, 2016, from Norway

Postby elkanah77; Mon Apr 23, 2018 2:45 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

Bombadil wrote:
elkanah77 wrote:
Bombadil wrote:80's best drum machine? :lol:

I had one. It tided me over until I got a Roland R-5. IMO, Yamaha's best drum machine from that era was the RX-5. Roland's was the R-70.


Sure, the RX5 is more advanced. Sometimes I just want the raw sound going easy and fast and there the RX11 excels. Both great though. I think the Roland TR-626 is the greatest Roland of the 80s.


I guess it depends on the motivation. I always wanted a drum machine that would emulate real drums as closely as possible. Throw a bit of reverb on the snare, keep the drums down in the mix, and if I pretended hard enough, I could almost believe they were real. Never quite, though. If you're doing electronica or other modern forms of music, then the artificiality is a plus, not a minus. I think the first one I used was a TR-606, but I can't be sure. The RX-5 was my favourite to work with, though.
I'm just glad that there are now sample-based drum programs that actually sound authentic.


Whatever does the job. That's key :D
tapper mike
KVRAF
 
4705 posts since 19 Jan, 2008

Postby tapper mike; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:06 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

Ah the days of learning how to program drum patterns.

Having played with more than enough piss poor drummers I didn't want mine to sound like a real drummer I wanted mine to keep time properly and follow direction.

Back in the 80's living in Florida it seemed like there was a pawn shop on every corner. One smart owner started to rent drum machines because they kept on being returned in a week or two. I loved renting them. Even into the 90's people would buy em. Not open the manual, get mad when they couldn't figure out how they worked and then dump them. Of all the 80's drum machines I'd owned or rented the Alesis HR-16 ,which came out in '88 was by far my favorite for realistic sounds. It wasn't my favorite for programming or pad. Generally I would use either my keyboard or Ibanez 2010 midi guitar as a controller. All was laid to rest when I got my Boss DR5
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xd5t67ULUE

I wrote and produced completed more songs with the DR-5 than all of my other drum machines, sequencers combined. I used to have one man band shows at local Holiday Inn's where I'd use it to record onto minidisc and bring it to the gig for backing parts. Now I can't even look at it. These days it's all coming out of one guitar. I'd rather play my own approach which is a combination of finger-style and tapping jazz unaccompanied.
tapper mike
KVRAF
 
4705 posts since 19 Jan, 2008

Postby tapper mike; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:06 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

dbl post, deleted
Last edited by tapper mike on Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
deastman
KVRAF
 
6744 posts since 6 Aug, 2003, from San Francisco Bay Area

Postby deastman; Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:28 am Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

I remember that by the end of the 80s, the pawn shops were full of Yamaha drum machines that they couldn’t seem to get rid of. Every other brand would sell quickly.

Also, I recall an interview with Vince Clarke, circa The Innocents, in which he was complaining that sampled drum machines sounded too real. He had someone combing the globe to buy up older drum synths so he could get away from that RX11 sound.
Incomplete list of my gear: 110V AC to 12V DC 1.5A power supply (+ tip)
spigmu
KVRist
 
35 posts since 10 Nov, 2012

Postby spigmu; Wed May 02, 2018 12:46 pm Re: Yamaha RX11 - Video tutorial/workflow on one of the 80s best drum machines

Regardless of whether of which drum machine sounded better or more or less lifelike, the RX11 and 15 suffered in one big way compared to the Rolands, and that is that they simply didn't "print to tape" well, and that goes for straight to digital as well. They sound good soloed and going through the sounds, but in the track they sounded weak no matter how they were processed. I'd say my biggest regret about my recordings from that era was that I owned an RX-15 and the studio I worked at had an RX-11, and at the time I wasn't unhappy with them. About a year after we had other options for drums, mostly samplers but also other not expensive drum machines, I couldn't bear to listen to the tracks with the 11 or 15 as the drums. They sounded lifeless and flat. On the other hand, mixes from that same period when people brought in their silly Roland 909s or 707s, recorded and mixed no differently, did NOT sound lifeless and flat. They sounded good enough that ten years later I didn't wish to heck I could replace them in the mixes, which I did, and still do, with the recordings with the 11 and 15.

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