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Frequency Range Chart....

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2005 5:21 am
by tkmattson
I've seen many posts in regard to "why does my x sound like x", so I thought I'd pass along one of the most valuable charts I've ever seen, from my second favorite audio book, "Practical Recording Techniques", which although very dated, and possibly out of print (?), is still very applicable. BTW - Favorite audio book is Tonmeister Technique from the 60's - serious old school. Anyway, here's the chart....

INSTRUMENT | FUNDAMENTAL | HARMONICS

flute | 261-2349 Hz | 3-8 kHz
oboe | 261-1568 Hz | 2-12 kHz
clarinet | 165-1568 Hz | 2-10 kHz
bassoon | 62-587 Hz | 3-8 kHz
trumpet | 165-988 Hz | 1-7.5 kHz
french horn | 87-880 Hz | 1-6 kHz
trombone | 73-587 Hz | 1-7.5 kHz
tuba | 49-587 Hz | 1-4 kHz
snare drum | 100-200 Hz | 1-20 kHz
kick drum | 30-147 Hz| 1-6 kHz
cymbals | 300-587 Hz | 1-15 kHz
violin | 196-3136 Hz | 4-15 kHz
viola | 131-1175 Hz | 2-8.5 kHz
cello | 65-698 Hz | 1-6.5 kHz
a.bass | 41-294 Hz | 1-5 kHz
e.bass | 41-300 Hz | 1-7 kHz
a.guitar | 82-988 Hz | 1-15 kHz
e.guitar (through amp) | 82-1319 Hz | 1-3.5 kHz
e.guitar (direct) | 82-1319 Hz | 1-15 kHz
piano | 28-4196 Hz | 5-8 kHz
bass vox | 87-392 Hz | 1-12 kHz
tenor vox | 131-494 Hz | 1-12 kHz
alto vox | 175-698 Hz | 2-12 kHz
soprano vox | 247-1175 Hz | 2-12 kHz


Happy EQing....

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2005 5:41 am
by digitaldoom
cool...

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2005 5:43 am
by zerobae
In Bob Katz' book "Mastering Audio" - always a joy to come back to - you'll find a drawing called "Musical pitch relation chart" from the Carnegie Hall - to take out of the book, unfold and pin to the wall. Not only does it depict orchestra instruments (plus human voices) and their frequency range, but also the corresponding notes on a piano roll. Beautiful!

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 10:36 am
by Stone
Hey thanks for that information!

I created a jpg chart with that info. perhaps people can find it useful!

Image

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:16 am
by JeffSanders
Cool of you to take the time to share this chart. Thanks.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:18 am
by ouroboros
thanks very much Stone. :)

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:41 pm
by Noox
Wow ! :o

Thank you tkmattson, very useful datas.
And thank you too Stone, downloading that JPEG right now.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:53 pm
by ouroboros
oops, thanks as well tkmattson :oops: :)

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:07 pm
by Noox
ouroboros wrote:oops, thanks as well tkmattson :oops: :)


You baaaaaaad, ungrateful boy ! :lol:

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:30 pm
by ouroboros
:lol:

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:40 pm
by scamme
Image

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:44 pm
by lebaron
Awesome.

Can someone please give a short explanation/clarification about what harmonics refers to. I'm not 100% sure I understand it.

Thanks.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 3:30 pm
by McLilith
I can give you an example of harmonics.

If you play an A-440 note on the piano, the dominant frequency of that note is 440 Hz. However, there is a lot more actually being played than a pure 440 Hz pitch (which would be a pure 440 Hz sine wave.) In addition to the dominant 440 Hz pitch, you are also producing the following pitches:

440 x 1 = 440 Hz
440 x 2 = 880 Hz
440 x 3 = 1,320 Hz
440 x 4 = 1,760 Hz
440 x 5 = 2,200 Hz
440 x 6 = 2,640 Hz
440 x 7 = 3,080 Hz
440 x 8 = 3,520 Hz
...and it keeps going far beyond this point.

Actually, I simplified the exact pitches of the piano note's harmonics. In reality, they aren't perfect integer multiples of the fundamental pitch. They're actually a bit sharper, or higher in pitch, than the values above suggest.

Harmonics are those additional distinct frequencies which occur above the fundamental frequency of a particular note. In addition to harmonics, a note might also have some random frequencies sounding, like the wind noise of a flute, for example. These aren't harmonics, but a noise component, because they don't occur near integer multiples of the fundamental frequency.

Does this help you understand the term harmonics?


take care,
McLilith

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 3:37 pm
by McLilith
Those are some handy charts. I've been working on compiling a master chart of all the instrument tunings I can find. For example, it would show the frequency in Hertz of every fret on a guitar, for each string on the guitar, and it would also have listings in the same chart for every instrument I can find tuning data for. It would also translate that frequency data into MIDI note numbers, complete with octave numbers and note letters, and perhaps to another system of tuning information as well.

I just don't have the silly chart ready yet. I'll let everyone know when it's done.


take care,
McLilith

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 3:39 pm
by nool
interesting charts, thank you :)