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 Ardour by Ardour is an Audio Plugin Host. It functions as a LADSPA Plugin. It can host VST Plugins, Audio Units Plugins, LADSPA Plugins and LV2 Plugins.
Ardour
Product Ardour
Developer Ardour
Price (MSRP) Free (Source Code) / Donation ($1+)
Type / Tags
Plug-in, App & Soundware Format(s)
Can Host
Instruments
   
Can Host
Effects
    
Operating System Availability
Operating
System
Latest
Version
Download Released
 5.10  Downloads Released
 5.10  Downloads Released
 5.10  Downloads Released
Supported Sample Formats (loads or saves) include
WAV
Miscellaneous Information
Copy ProtectionNone
GPL

Ardour is a digital audio workstation. You can use it to record, edit and mix multi-track audio. Produce your own CDs. Mix video soundtracks. Experiment with new ideas about music and sound. Generate sound installations for 12 speaker gallery shows. Have Fun.

Ardour capabilities include:

  • Multi-channel recording.
  • Non-linear, non-destructive region based editing with unlimited undo/redo.
  • Full automation support.
  • A mixer whose capabilities rival high end hardware consoles.
  • Lots of plugins to warp, shift and shape your music.
  • Controllable from hardware control surfaces at the same time as it syncs to timecode.

Review Ardour Now!

Discussion: Active

Discussion

22 April 2015 at 10:35amHypnogoddess

I would no longer call Ardour "Donationware"; nor if I were KVR Admin, would I be listing it amongst the freeware. The only "free" version available now and going forward, is a demo version which after 10 minutes, inserts silences into music at random intervals. If one doesn't donate, this demo version is all that is available to the user. Mandatory donation to get a fully functional product = commercial software at "pay what you like" pricing; not freeware or donationware!

22 April 2015 at 12:31pmLost_Highway

Hypnogoddess: what you say is incorrect, Ardour can be obtained without charge. To obtain a ready-to-run version, yes, you have to pay a minimum of $1, or there's the demo version which goes silent after 10 minutes.

It is possible to obtain Ardour, unrestricted, without paying anything. The source code is available free of charge – a donation is totally optional – and there is no 10 minute restriction. All that is required is to build it from source yourself, which isn't difficult (I've done it myself a few times) and something that many Linux users are comfortable with. Also, it is available free-of-charge in many repositories, although some lag behind the version available from the Ardour website.

19 May 2015 at 7:21amHypnogoddess

@Lost_Highway.

Is that source code for Windows, or for Linux? I'm a Windows user and a non-coder. A demo version which goes silent after 10 minutes is of no use whatsoever except for eval purposes, which is why such are made. The article in question was about the current version of Ardour, not a repository version which lags two or three revisions behind.

Therefore, seeing as how unless there is a compilable version for Windows, which will still require one to find a compatible compiler (which will most likely come at a further fee) there is still a mandatory donation to use the full version of Ardour, my statement that it cannot be considered either freeware or donationware still stands. Most true donationware I have seen is a voluntary rather than a mandatory donation, and the pre-donation download isn't crippleware.

14 August 2016 at 8:05pmNumanoid

The source code may be free, but you get no support.

For those not being a professional computer troubleshooter that just aint enough.

THIS POST HAS BEEN REMOVED

5 October 2016 at 8:39pmMatthew Morse

Hypno: Pull down a free multimedia Linux distro such as UbuntuStudio, and Ardour is free. It obligates you to use Linux as your OS but that really ain't so bad.

6 June 2017 at 5:29amLhud

"It obligates you to use Linux as your OS but that really ain't so bad."

I'm not going to brown nose Microsoft any here but it does come pretty much ready to go. Linux is for people who might want to actually do something with their computer but instead love to build every piece of its software identity that they never go outside and play. Funny aside, I really gave Ubuntu a solid go and I have to say that I spent about 90% of my time trying to fix and re-fix installs of everything I wanted to use, including the aforementioned DAW. I have other things to do besides spend my time in every Linux chatroom trying to understand what was always going wrong with my system. I even dual booted Windows with Ubuntu so I could atleast have a functioning machine while trying to learn all of the intricacies of Linuxese when it dawned on me that all of the tools I love to use were in my Windows install already. I formatted the partition and never looked back. Yeah, Microsoft creates lots of problems but I can make music in it a whole lot better than I ever could with Ubuntu.

6 June 2017 at 10:52amHypnogoddess

I dual-boot Open SUSE with Windows 10 these days; but with all of the dynamite DAWs available on the MS platform; plus the fact that Ardour is the Linux version of the extremely proprietary (Last I looked it wouldn't take standard VST synths and all effects plugins must be bought from the devs) Harrison Mixbus, I've given up on Ardour entirely.

I use Linux for occasional video creation (still do most of that in Windows); and anything from Adobe Audition, to Zynewave Podium for audio in Windows. I'm not brown nosing MS either; but the whole Linux Dev community is fragmented, with new "distros" coming out every month or so. They can't even agree on which mainstream distro is best to base spinoffs on; I track Distrowatch bi-weekly, so I know what I am talking about when I say this.

Like @Lhud said; one can make music a lot more easily in Windows, so I that is what I'll stick with for media production in general. Linux is an "OS playground" for me and most likely will remain so.

6 June 2017 at 11:04amHypnogoddess

I dual-boot Open SUSE with Windows 10 these days; but with all of the dynamite DAWs available on the MS platform; plus the fact that Ardour is the Linux version of the extremely proprietary (Last I looked it wouldn't take standard VST synths and all effects plugins must be bought from the devs) Harrison Mixbus, I've given up on Ardour entirely (I'm Steinberg-only when it comes to Virtual Instruments; I don't rate LADSPA at all. That's why I gave up on LMMS at an early stage in my music making.).

I use Linux for occasional video creation (still do most of that in Windows); and anything from Adobe Audition, to Zynewave Podium for audio in Windows. I'm not brown nosing MS either; but the whole Linux Dev community is fragmented, with new "distros" coming out every month or so. They can't even agree on which mainstream distro is best to base spinoffs on; I track Distrowatch bi-weekly, so I know what I am talking about when I say this.

Like @Lhud said; one can make music a lot more easily in Windows, so I that is what I'll stick with for media production in general. Linux is an "OS playground" for me and most likely will remain so.

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