Log InCreate An Account
  1. Developers
  2. »
  3. z
  4. »
  5. Zero-G
Zero-G
Sales:
info@zero-g.co.uk
Support:
info@zero-g.co.uk

Zero-G is totally dedicated to sampling, sound FX and music production, and make sounds for people who are equally dedicated to music making. Since 1991 they have been one of the world's largest content providers specialising in music samples, virtual instruments and sound effects for today's professional and amateur music producers.

You're In Good Company:
The users of Zero-G products include many of the world's foremost recording artists, producers, session players, remixers, multi-media developers and film composers. The high profile nature of their users' projects means that Zero-G samples are regularly featured in radio and television programmes, major motion pictures, adverts and internet audio, and of course, major artists' record releases.

"With Zero-G you can expect quality" (Sound on Sound magazine, UK).

"This is virtuoso sound design" (Keyboard magazine, USA).

Creative Inspiration never came this fast... Zero-G products are truly unique and are among the most critically-acclaimed in the industry, consistently achieving excellent reviews in leading magazines.

Professional Content Solution:

Zero-G has often produced sounds for major corporations - for example Roland, Yamaha, Akai, Microsoft, Apple, Mixman, and Sony - as well as for Radio, Television, films and major record companies. They can provide an unbeatable library of sounds for use with any sound hardware or software product - including mobile communication products, world-class computer and console games, music production software or web designers' tools, etc. With over 400,000 professional quality audio samples at their disposal, Zero-G can provide efficient and effective sound solutions of the highest quality.

Why Choose Zero-G?

High professional standards and consistent artistic integrity make Zero-G a superb choice when seeking sonic inspiration for your own audio or visual productions, or added value content for your products. Their sound libraries feature a vast array of loops, beats, riffs & rhythms, breaks, hits, chords, tones, ambiences and effects from a mind-boggling array of musical styles and difficult-to-find sources, from the classic, timeless, or exotic, to the very latest dance styles. All were created by dedicated and innovative minds in order to provide new creative inspiration and accelerate the process of modern computer-based music making. Put simply, Zero-G's sample libraries enable musicians, producers and consumers to create cutting-edge music of the highest quality, individuality and integrity.

Products by Zero-G

Latest reviews of Zero-G products

Outer Limits
Reviewed By mdg
February 7th, 2006

Outer Limits has a huge library and thats the best part of the program. The basic interface provided is limited but allows some creativity. The user license is restrictive and thats not so good, be careful when you use this program. The samples may not be imported into any sampler you wish... This is an instrument with a sample library included or tied into the intrument.

The sounds range from dark and moody, even spooky I suppose- to bright and twinkling ones. I intend to use the sounds as part of an overall mix, not that the sounds are unfit for soloing but due to the before mentioned user agreement.

Outer limits has had a few loading errors when I use it in Cubase and required repairing or reloading. This is a newer program so I expect a few bugs. The program is sold as being eerie and mysterious...evil maybe. I find that the sounds have exellent aplications for many sound styles and not all that 'dark' but rather are intense and sonically odd. If you are looking to flesh out a soundscape these sounds may well fit your needs, if you intend to use a patch for a lenghty solo, contact the seller and pay the fee as it is not a 'stand alone' product. The sound banks are not bread and butter sounds like trumpets and flutes but are odd backgrounds, drones and quirky bleeps and splashes floating across a soundstage. Just insure that the soundstage has a few other sounds on it to avoid legal issues. Outer Limits should be thought of as being a spice in a mix not the meat. The basic included interface is useful but limited. The graphics are not very spectacular but basic. This VSTi uses a lot of HD space but streams and thats good, you will need a large RAM and fast computer to run this program that loads from DVD drives only.
I give the sound designer 5 thumbs up but the limited legal use and graphic interface restrict the programs usefulness. If you need to add to a mix this might save you several hours of programming dozens of softsynths and hardware based synthesizers (as well as storing and maintaining them) then mixing them, just for a touch of strangeness.
The cost is reasonable and the trend of sound developers moving towards making REALLY new sounds is also a plus. This is for making space music, effects or ambient, not dance music or top 40 styles.
(edited after using for several months)
I still use it but it has become less useful as I find it hard to set the sounds into many mixes. I think I grew tired of the dark elements over time but if you keep the sound mixed down a bit it adds spookiness without dominating. I have decided that the limited interface and choices as well as the lack of more complex modulation and filters really keep this program from being better. Run it through some modulating delays and it is much more interesting! I wish it had more patches and that there was some updates but it is what it is, the change in ownership of the company probably didn't help much.

I do own hardware and soft synths and I notice that all softsynths tend to get a bit stale and I usually find what patches I like and work with those. Mixing Outer limits with spacey synth washes and re-sampling is the ticket here. Cut a nice wav section and push that through Absynth if you want to mutate the sound beyond recognition, use extreme EQ and resample....rinse and repeat. I would only buy this if you already have pretty much all the FM, subtractive and additive stuff covered and REALLY need that extra weirdness. When people hear Outer Limits in my small studio I usually get a funny look so I tend to use it when no one is around. Was that a noise in my closet? No, just an echo. Ian Boddy , you are one strange sound designer!

The sound quality still seems really great and the sonic/psychological effects of 'Outer limits' still makes me have goose bumps. Listening to Boddy's songs on emusic.com has made me more aware of the dark side of the force. This program is another example of using a small yet powerful sample of his analog arsenal as a building block for my own work. I have noticed I am beginning to look at overall sound design a bit differently and what price is that worth?
I am happier now with the program than I was when I first purchased it. But then again, I enjoy barbeque potato chips and peanut butter and grape jam sandwiches so don't say I didn't warn you!
Read Review

Sounds of the 70s
Reviewed By Syncopator
September 9th, 2005

(Version 1.0.3.0021 RTAS/TDM)

Honestly, this is one of the worst libraries I've ever purchased. I am consistently disappointed with these Zero-G titles. In my opinion they are nowhere near up to EastWest's standards, but EastWest is not creating them; they're just distributing them (AFAIKT).

Sot70s is a hodge podge of poorly recorded and poorly edited samples, organized into "construction kits" and "toolkits" which offer additional samples organized by category. All of the samples are essentially loops which have been sliced for use in the Intakt player. I bought this library because I have to create some disco and 70s-style tracks for a big project, and as I listened to kit after kit, I found practically nothing I could ever use.

The fidelity is poor, and there's generally a "sloppy" character to many of the loops. The loops sound ameteurish and have far too much processing. then, when several of these processed loops are combined, you get a phasey "soup," which I find flat-out unusable.

I should have learned my lesson with "Nu Jointz." Sot70s is similarly sloppy and contains almost nothing usable, IMO, for serious music production. Both are like "toy" or "kiddie" versions of what they should have been. A random collection of bad loops thrown together to form a library.

Needless to say, depending upon your needs, YMMV. But I personally give Sot70s a grade of F-minus.

No more Zero-G for me.
Read Review

Morphology
Reviewed By x_bruce
May 31st, 2004

Zero-G wins with this simple and ready to go soundscape and ambient sound generator. There area 3.2 gigabytes of data to work with in Kompakt's synth engine. The engine features a great deal of visual feedback, better than average synth features and acceptable effects, if you even bother.

There are hundreds, if not thousands of atmospheres and rolling, boiling, moving sounds that are easy to assemble your own patches and MULTIS. A MULTI is nothing more than using any of the 8 channels available polyphonically. They can be set to all one channel or eight different ones. There are many strategies you may try. In any case the MULTI strategy is a good one as you can set up animated sounds with each sample you use. While not much for leads or basses Morphology is great for mood. At $160 street price you aren't going to do much better and for the price of a few loop libraries you can do your own and best of all, since the CPU use is light you can do so with very great detail.

A must for film, ambient, even harder music styles that need drones and sounds that make impact they are here and they are super easy to program. In terms of value, incredible value. In terms if you need it, ask yourself if you can make similar sounds. If you have a lot of synths and time to make perfect loops then you dono't need Morphology. If time is valuable to you then Morphology is close to essential. Keep in mind this is not phenominal sampling, more like great taste in general.

And if you are a Kontakt user, you will be able to work with Morphology providing you purchased the 1.5 upgrade. It is a worthwhile synth even when it becomes apparant the samples are highly developed. Forget that and listen to what you have to work with. It can be a humbling expeience.

Here's what it comes down to. There are sounds, even pitched ones, that are of use in many styles of music and you can do a good amount of your own programming. If that worries you a day with Kompakt and reading the manual and you'll be much more confident. Unlike the loop libraries so many people purchased, you don't have to sound like everyone else as you can find your own voice within the aether of floating sounds and jackhammer noisescapes.

Recommended for anyone interested in all types of ambience, new programmers wanting to learn without messing up - it's hard to do so in Morphology. If you like this kind of abstract work Morphology will keep your work fresh and unlike others, even other Morphology users.

Simple, but simplicity is often the makings of vastly complex sounds. This is a specialized synthesizer but Morphology could easily be the one synth you need to compose with. As a composer I like changing timbres around and can strongly recommend Vapor by East West as a companion synth. As a specialist Morphology is wonderful, as anything other than it's specialty Morphology is two dimensional. If moods of all sorts is your thing you will be very happy and lost in Morphology's depth of sonic worlds.
Read Review

Timeline of Latest Product Changes [view all]

Latest News from Zero-G

Latest Videos from Zero-G