Electri6ity

VST, AU, AAX, etc. plug-in Virtual Instruments discussion
KVRist
30 posts since 22 Nov, 2013

Post Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:13 pm

Another week passed, more emails to Vir2 and even to bigfishaudio, but no reply.

It seems I made a mistake buying Electri6ity. I googled for advice on how to get support from Vir2 and found several other threads about their horrible technical support and refusal to acknowledge and fix bugs (to give only two examples).

WARNING: BEWARE OF BUYING ANY VIR2 PRODUCTS!

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KVRAF
20450 posts since 8 Oct, 2014

Post Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:37 pm

anton_s wrote:Another week passed, more emails to Vir2 and even to bigfishaudio, but no reply.

It seems I made a mistake buying Electri6ity. I googled for advice on how to get support from Vir2 and found several other threads about their horrible technical support and refusal to acknowledge and fix bugs (to give only two examples).

WARNING: BEWARE OF BUYING ANY VIR2 PRODUCTS!
I guess everybody is going to have different experiences. I purchased both Electri6ity and Acou6tic and can't be happier with them. I can't even begin to tell you how many tracks I have used these guitars on. I'd be lost without them when doing hard rock, metal or any genre that uses guitars.

KVRAF
6419 posts since 5 Aug, 2009

Post Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:54 pm

How is it compared to shreddage2?
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KVRAF
20450 posts since 8 Oct, 2014

Post Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:07 pm

Caine123 wrote:How is it compared to shreddage2?
From what I've heard from other users as well as demos is that Shreddage seems to be more targeted to heavy metal whereas Electri6ity is a more all around guitar collection.

As far as actual technical specs regarding size of library number of articulations, etc., no clue.

Look at it this way. You can get Shreddage 2 for $139 from the site itself. Electri6ity is $399.95.

So you tell me. Which do you think is the more complete library?

When I checked out both before buying, IMO, Electri6ity blew Shreddage 2 away in every aspect including sound.

YMMV.

KVRAF
6419 posts since 5 Aug, 2009

Post Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:16 pm

wagtunes wrote:
Caine123 wrote:How is it compared to shreddage2?
From what I've heard from other users as well as demos is that Shreddage seems to be more targeted to heavy metal whereas Electri6ity is a more all around guitar collection.

As far as actual technical specs regarding size of library number of articulations, etc., no clue.

Look at it this way. You can get Shreddage 2 for $139 from the site itself. Electri6ity is $399.95.

So you tell me. Which do you think is the more complete library?

When I checked out both before buying, IMO, Electri6ity blew Shreddage 2 away in every aspect including sound.

YMMV.
thx wagtunes! seems this will be still on my wishlist
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KVRist
30 posts since 22 Nov, 2013

Post Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:22 am

wagtunes wrote:I guess everybody is going to have different experiences. I purchased both Electri6ity and Acou6tic and can't be happier with them. I can't even begin to tell you how many tracks I have used these guitars on. I'd be lost without them when doing hard rock, metal or any genre that uses guitars.
Could you please take a look at my queries in the previous posts? Perhaps you know the answer to some of them.

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KVRAF
20450 posts since 8 Oct, 2014

Post Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:31 am

anton_s wrote:
wagtunes wrote:I guess everybody is going to have different experiences. I purchased both Electri6ity and Acou6tic and can't be happier with them. I can't even begin to tell you how many tracks I have used these guitars on. I'd be lost without them when doing hard rock, metal or any genre that uses guitars.
Could you please take a look at my queries in the previous posts? Perhaps you know the answer to some of them.
Already did. Not a clue. I don't really get into the minutia with the software. I use it for what I need it for. To make the most realistic guitar sounds that I can. To that end, I only use what functionality I need and don't concern myself with how things are done. I look at the articulations chart, see which one I need to program to make that sound, and do it. In short, I don't have the time to tear this thing to shreds and figure out all the ins and outs of it.

Life's too short.

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KVRist
50 posts since 22 Feb, 2007 from Los Angeles, CA

Post Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:49 am

Sorry for the delayed reply :) Thanks for the questions. I have read through them, and will try to answer the technical aspects, while addressing the subjective portions as best I can.
I was unsure how the settings in Settings|Vibrato|Type Default| interact with the setting in the Performance tab, and which takes precedence. However, I think I have figured it out:
Whenever an articulation keyswitch is played, it activates the corresponding Settings|Vibrato|Default|, which remains in effect until another keyswitch or CC27 is played. Whenever CC27 is played, it activates the vibrato type of the Performance page, and it also remains in effect until a keyswitch or another CC27 is played. So the vibrato type is determined by whichever was played last: the keyswitch or the CC.
Am I correct?
Yes, you are correct, that is is how the instrument is set up.
Two vibrato types that I am still wondering about, are "1=Default (fade)" and "6=Default (instant)". What is the "Default" vibrato?
At first, I guessed that these would refer to the default types selected in Settings|Vibrato|Type default|, but apparently they do not. They seem to be somewhat intermediate between the other fast/slow strong/soft types.
The difference is when the vibrato sample begins. For "6=Default (instant)" the vibrato starts immediately, while "1=Default (fade)" will wait a moment to add the vibrato sample.
What factors influence the body sustain of a guitar, and would it be realistic to have different body sustains for different modes and/or articulations?
Many factors contribute to body sustain of a guitar. (e.g. a hollow body guitar will have more “body sustain” than a solid body at the sample level.) There are also many recording factors and backend tricks that we built into the instrument to make body sustain more consistent across the board.

It would not be more realistic to add different amounts of body sustain to different articulations in most cases, unless you are trying to mimic bizarre feedback, or get a specific “sound design” tone, then setting these up to roughly the same value is the best way to go.
What setting would you advise for the fastest, noodliest speed metal arpeggio?

* If I use the Tremolo keyswitch to play a fast tremolo, would Electri6ity's AI automatically adjust the Pre-Pick Wait time, or should I do it manually?

* If I set Compensate Sustain to the maximum (20ms), do I still need to adjust the Pre-Pick Noise Wait manually when sequencing fast passages (without using the Tremolo keyswitch)?
This depends on so many factors: guitar, effects, mix, etc. Really these settings are up to your personal preference. I encourage you to tweak until you find the best result for your production.

Electri6ity does not auto-adjust pre-pick wait time while using a tremolo key switch, this will need to be set manually. The same goes for Compensate Sustain.
Does Electri6ity's AI automatically adjust the amount of drift to the velocity of the MIDI note, or should I manually increase/decrease the setting when picking hard/softly?
No this parameter is not adjusted, but at a sample level, the recording of a higher velocity note will have a natural amount of drift.
Are these options only different EQ/recording/ADSR settings, or do they correspond to different playing techniques? (If I want a real-life guitarist to play "Bright" or "Mellow", what should I ask her to do?)
These are simply different EQ and recording techniques, however playing “bright” or “mellow” depends on the artist/style/technique etc., subjective categories.
Please also take a look at my original question regarding legato picking. As wagtunes pointed out, legato lines often involve hammer-ons, pull-offs and slides. However, it sometimes is necessary to pick notes in a legato line (particularly in styles such as Black Metal that play legato melodies using tremolo picking without HO/PO), and I am unsure how to sequence that.
(The question also applies to tremolo picking: If I want to re-pick a note using the repeat keys, should the original note overlap with the repeated note, should there be a slight gap between the notes, or should their end and start align precisely?)
Each note should end at the exact tick at which the next note starts. Electri6ity will automatically insert the appropriate release/transition samples for each unique MIDI note to the degree that they are set. Each situation is very different (even within a specific genre like Black Metal), so trying different techniques with MIDI notes will yield different results. I recommend trying different sequence techniques to achieve your desired sound.

Humanize|Sloppiness versus Humanize|Pre-Pick Noise|Wait
What is the difference between the settings Humanize|Sloppiness and Humanize|Pre-Pick Noise|Wait, and how do they interact?
(In the manual, the descriptions of these settings are very similar:
* Sloppiness: "guitar notes contain a relatively large pre-attack phase (which might vary slightly in length) where you can hear the plectrum (see 9.1 Picking Noise) but not the tone itself. Leaving this pre-attack portion in the samples raises the perceived latency, but increases the realism."
* Pre-Pick Noise Wait: "You can setup the delay between pre-pick noise and the actual ‘tone’ of a picked note here. Per default there is no delay. But in sequencer environment you can raise the level of realism by tweaking this setting till you get the best result.")
These are two different sample sets. Humanize/Sloppiness is a set of samples that mimics slight human error in fretting, pitch, missed notes, etc. Humanize/Pre-Pick noise mimics a guitar player’s natural tendency to place the pick on the string before a phrase or note is played. These do not interact with one another, but can be used together to create a realistic performance.
11.5 Sloppiness | Compensate Sustain (avoid gaps)
The manual states: "11.5 [...] We recommend to set the compensation to the highest sloppiness amount you set in 11.4 and 11.5."
* Since Compensate Sustain is itself 11.5, does this sentence perhaps refer to 11.6 instead? (However, 11.6 Pre-Pick Noise | Wait goes up to 30ms while Compensate Sustain only goes up to 20ms, so if 11.6 Pre-Pick Noise | Wait is set at maximum, Compensate Sustain cannot equal it.)
This final sentence is a recommendation, which should appear separate from 11.4 and 11.5. These two settings (Sloppiness and Sloppiness Compensate Sustain) can both be set to 20ms.
Vir2 Instruments Support Team
www.vir2.com

KVRist
30 posts since 22 Nov, 2013

Post Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:34 pm

vir2 wrote:
Two vibrato types that I am still wondering about, are "1=Default (fade)" and "6=Default (instant)". What is the "Default" vibrato?
The difference is when the vibrato sample begins. For "6=Default (instant)" the vibrato starts immediately, while "1=Default (fade)" will wait a moment to add the vibrato sample.
I understand the difference between the "instant" and "fade" versions, but I am unsure about what "Default" vibrato is:

At first, I guessed that "Default" vibrato (in the Performance tab) would refer to the default vibrato types selected in Settings|Vibrato|Type default|, but apparently this is not the case.

Instead, "Default" seems to be a separate type of vibrato, somewhat intermediate between the other fast/slow strong/soft types.

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KVRist
50 posts since 22 Feb, 2007 from Los Angeles, CA

Post Fri Nov 03, 2017 8:59 am

anton_s wrote:
vir2 wrote:
Two vibrato types that I am still wondering about, are "1=Default (fade)" and "6=Default (instant)". What is the "Default" vibrato?
The difference is when the vibrato sample begins. For "6=Default (instant)" the vibrato starts immediately, while "1=Default (fade)" will wait a moment to add the vibrato sample.
I understand the difference between the "instant" and "fade" versions, but I am unsure about what "Default" vibrato is:

At first, I guessed that "Default" vibrato (in the Performance tab) would refer to the default vibrato types selected in Settings|Vibrato|Type default|, but apparently this is not the case.

Instead, "Default" seems to be a separate type of vibrato, somewhat intermediate between the other fast/slow strong/soft types.
The 'type default' settings for articulation vibrato correspond to the 12 types of vibrato on the performance page. The vibrato settings page lets you add vibrato to specific articulations (see page 39, article 8.3 of your manual).

For example:
In the settings page, if you select "6" for "Vibrato | Type Default | Articulation Sustain," that means that you are adding the "Default (Instant)" vibrato for Sustain articulations.
Vir2 Instruments Support Team
www.vir2.com

KVRist
30 posts since 22 Nov, 2013

Post Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:28 am

vir2 wrote:
anton_s wrote:
vir2 wrote:
Two vibrato types that I am still wondering about, are "1=Default (fade)" and "6=Default (instant)". What is the "Default" vibrato?
The difference is when the vibrato sample begins. For "6=Default (instant)" the vibrato starts immediately, while "1=Default (fade)" will wait a moment to add the vibrato sample.
I understand the difference between the "instant" and "fade" versions, but I am unsure about what "Default" vibrato is:

At first, I guessed that "Default" vibrato (in the Performance tab) would refer to the default vibrato types selected in Settings|Vibrato|Type default|, but apparently this is not the case.

Instead, "Default" seems to be a separate type of vibrato, somewhat intermediate between the other fast/slow strong/soft types.
The 'type default' settings for articulation vibrato correspond to the 12 types of vibrato on the performance page. The vibrato settings page lets you add vibrato to specific articulations (see page 39, article 8.3 of your manual).

For example:
In the settings page, if you select "6" for "Vibrato | Type Default | Articulation Sustain," that means that you are adding the "Default (Instant)" vibrato for Sustain articulations.
I am not sure how I can make the question any clearer: *What* is Default vibrato??

The other types of vibrato have descriptive names such as "Fast soft", "Slow strong" etc. Why is Default different? Is there something special about Default?

An informative answer would mention things such as:
* Is Default a separate type of vibrato, with its own distinctive depth and frequency, or is it equivalent to one of the other types? (Is there perhaps there is a setting somewhere where, for example, "Slow soft" can be set as the "Default" vibrato?)
* If Default is a separate type of vibrato, is its depth and frequency intermediate between Strong vs Soft, and Fast vs Slow?
* Are the other types of vibrato produced by LFOs, whereas the Default vibrato is a played, recorded vibrato? (This is a distinction that some other libraries make.)
* Or is Default also produced by LFO, but perhaps with tweaks to make the LFO more humanized and realistic?

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KVRist
50 posts since 22 Feb, 2007 from Los Angeles, CA

Post Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:53 am

anton_s wrote:
vir2 wrote:
anton_s wrote:
vir2 wrote:
Two vibrato types that I am still wondering about, are "1=Default (fade)" and "6=Default (instant)". What is the "Default" vibrato?
The difference is when the vibrato sample begins. For "6=Default (instant)" the vibrato starts immediately, while "1=Default (fade)" will wait a moment to add the vibrato sample.
I understand the difference between the "instant" and "fade" versions, but I am unsure about what "Default" vibrato is:

At first, I guessed that "Default" vibrato (in the Performance tab) would refer to the default vibrato types selected in Settings|Vibrato|Type default|, but apparently this is not the case.

Instead, "Default" seems to be a separate type of vibrato, somewhat intermediate between the other fast/slow strong/soft types.
The 'type default' settings for articulation vibrato correspond to the 12 types of vibrato on the performance page. The vibrato settings page lets you add vibrato to specific articulations (see page 39, article 8.3 of your manual).

For example:
In the settings page, if you select "6" for "Vibrato | Type Default | Articulation Sustain," that means that you are adding the "Default (Instant)" vibrato for Sustain articulations.
I am not sure how I can make the question any clearer: *What* is Default vibrato??

The other types of vibrato have descriptive names such as "Fast soft", "Slow strong" etc. Why is Default different? Is there something special about Default?

An informative answer would mention things such as:
* Is Default a separate type of vibrato, with its own distinctive depth and frequency, or is it equivalent to one of the other types? (Is there perhaps there is a setting somewhere where, for example, "Slow soft" can be set as the "Default" vibrato?)
* If Default is a separate type of vibrato, is its depth and frequency intermediate between Strong vs Soft, and Fast vs Slow?
* Are the other types of vibrato produced by LFOs, whereas the Default vibrato is a played, recorded vibrato? (This is a distinction that some other libraries make.)
* Or is Default also produced by LFO, but perhaps with tweaks to make the LFO more humanized and realistic?
Electri6ity does not employ any LFO vibrato. 'Default' vibrato is a separate sample set to those with descriptive names such as fast, slow, soft and strong, because those descriptors deviate from the 'default.' It would be most accurate to say that 'default' is somewhere between fast and slow, soft and strong.
Vir2 Instruments Support Team
www.vir2.com

KVRian

Topic Starter

1179 posts since 4 Aug, 2004 from Ain't tellin' ya...

Post Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:03 pm

Oh so the vibrato is baked into the samples?
Little Black Dog - 2008-Present

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KVRAF
20450 posts since 8 Oct, 2014

Post Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:07 pm

benjamind wrote:Oh so the vibrato is baked into the samples?
Yes. Everything you hear is a sample being triggered.

KVRian

Topic Starter

1179 posts since 4 Aug, 2004 from Ain't tellin' ya...

Post Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:35 pm

Ok I don't like baked vibrato in anything because it often sounds fake. Maybe it sounds great with Electri6ity because of the natural recorded notes and everything was done perfectly. But baked vibrato seems to put me off. But I can just add tremolo to nonvibrato parts which would get me the desired sound.
Little Black Dog - 2008-Present

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