Hit 'n' Mix Infinity – Looks interesting!!!

VST, AU, AAX, etc. plug-in Virtual Instruments discussion
Kalamata Kid
KVRAF
3865 posts since 27 Jul, 2001 from Tarpon Springs, Florida, USA

Post Sat Aug 31, 2019 2:47 pm

Wondering about Hit 'n' Mix Infinity
https://hitnmix.com/infinity/
I suppose it is a VSTi?
Looks very interesting and costs $299.
Seems similar to Melodyne.
https://www.celemony.com/en/melodyne/what-is-melodyne

All comments are welcome.
23" 10-touch Monitor and iPad Air as Midi Controllers, iConnectMIDI2+, Windows Pro 10-64bit, i9-9900k, 32 GB RAM.

Kalamata Kid
KVRAF
3865 posts since 27 Jul, 2001 from Tarpon Springs, Florida, USA

Re: Hit 'n' Mix Infinity – Check it out!!!

Post Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:37 am

I am surprised :o at the lack of interest in Infinity.

I wonder if can use my samples or is it restricted to the samples provided?
23" 10-touch Monitor and iPad Air as Midi Controllers, iConnectMIDI2+, Windows Pro 10-64bit, i9-9900k, 32 GB RAM.

h919078
KVRer
1 posts since 3 Nov, 2018

Re: Hit 'n' Mix Infinity – Looks interesting!!!

Post Wed Sep 11, 2019 1:51 am

I've used this program for a few years now (since version 2 was released) and this program is useful for a few things!

The positives:

1. You can break down tracks and listen to each note individually (and quickly transcribe a track or melody if you aren't musically inclined)

2. If you want to extract an element, you can. However, be prepared to do lots of refinements either in the program (paid version only) or outside of it in a spectral editor.

3. It can be a neat way to visualize a music track. It's pretty to look at!

4. If you know Python and own the paid edition, then you can write your own scripts and extensions. I can't code, but it seems to be pretty capable...

5. The developers are quick to respond to any inquiries or questions you may have about this program.

6. With each new version, their algorithms improve a lot. Seeing how far they've come since 1.x is insane. They have some neat things going on, such as smart "drum attenuation" when there's a long note being held.

The negatives:

1. This program, in it's current form, is very CPU intensive. I cannot stress this enough... I have an HP Z600 workstation which has 2 Xeon 5675 CPUs (12 cores and 24 threads total) and it maxes out the CPU at 100% for roughly 10 minutes and it will let me see the track and edit it then...

2. The results, in virtually every case, need lots of refinement and cleaning up before they can be used for whatever it is you're looking to do. In some cases, you can do very simple refinements, such as doing a low-pass on the part (as there tends to be a lot of bleed in the upper areas). Audacity's spectral editor is quite good for refining separated elements. Can't recommend it enough!

3. The price could be considered by many to be a bit much, but you should keep in mind that none of the previous versions had any of the refinement tools or the RipScript API. It's obvious that a lot of work went into this release, so they have to charge enough to break even with the R&D costs and still make a profit.

4. It is purely algorithmic (as far as I can tell). Virtually all source separation applications use neural networks (XTRAX STEMS, Izotope RX 7, ADX TRAX, DeMIX, PhonicMind, etc..) and not straight-up algorithms. This, of course, could be considered inefficient and a slow way to do it, but I think making sophisticated algorithms and perfecting them over time is better than training a neural network to do it all. Am I saying that just a neural network is bad? No... If you train a network well enough, you can most definitely get cleanly separated stems to work with!

Overall, this program has come quite a long way since it's inception and I always look forward to any updates which come out for it...

BTW: It's not a VST. It's standalone software.

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