Seven years in the making - here is the first single from "Pippi is dead. And we killed her."

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Harry_HH
KVRAF
3276 posts since 4 Aug, 2006 from Helsinki

Post Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:23 am

JurassicJakob wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 7:10 am
Harry_HH wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 6:27 am
AFAIK, Pippi Långstrumpa is kicking and alive, performing as a adult dancer.
And here I thought she was doing time in jail. On a more serious note, the "Pippi is dead. And we killed her." "Pippi is dead. And we killed her." refers to the famous "God is dead"-quote by Friedrich Nietzsche, who used the phrase to express the idea that the Enlightenment had "killed" the possibility of belief in God. In my version, Pippi Longstocking -- being the symbol for youthful strength and adolescent naivety -- is the one being killed. This marks the end of a happy childhood and the beginning of real life.
The piece and production are great - for some reason gives me flashbacks to the Kashmir, and their Rocket Brothers (not do much soundwise, but because of the atmosphère.

BTW, my comment about the Pippi as a strip dancer wasn't completely a joke, the actress Inger Nilsson was (is?) quite a hot
https://goo.gl/images/t8Wcjh
And much more than a symbol for youthful strength and adolescent naivety, Pippi represent feminism, "Girl Power". I don't know how this fits to your "Nietzsche philosophy". :party:

JurassicJakob
KVRer
22 posts since 21 Nov, 2013 from Sweden

Re: Seven years in the making - here is the first single from "Pippi is dead. And we killed her."

Post Sat Dec 15, 2018 7:46 am

Harry_HH wrote:
Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:23 am
The piece and production are great - for some reason gives me flashbacks to the Kashmir, and their Rocket Brothers (not do much soundwise, but because of the atmosphère.

BTW, my comment about the Pippi as a strip dancer wasn't completely a joke, the actress Inger Nilsson was (is?) quite a hot
https://goo.gl/images/t8Wcjh
And much more than a symbol for youthful strength and adolescent naivety, Pippi represent feminism, "Girl Power". I don't know how this fits to your "Nietzsche philosophy". :party:
Thank you Harry_HH, makes me happy to hear that! I haven't heard Kashmir, will check it out.

Oh I didn't know that about Inger Nilsson, pretty interesting.

I'm glad you asked this question. I guess people have different ideas of what Pippi stands for. I think it is fairly reasonable to assume that it was never Astrid Lindgren's intention to create a feminist symbol. There are also many types of feminism, and people often make the case that Pippi stands for a liberal sort of feminism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberal_feminism), encouraging female independence and strength, in comparison to social feminism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_feminism), aiming more at changing social policy. But this seems like a later construct rather than something that naturally follows from reading Pippi Longstocking per se. In any case, it is not my intention to use Pippi as a symbol for feminism, although some people do and might interpret it in that way. On the forthcoming EP, there's a song titled "Pippi is dead", with the opening lyrics "Pippi Longstocking is dead / quote some Neil Young / Put a shoot-gun to her head", referring to the suicide of Kurt Cobain. For me, this is going from a naive, idealistic and optimistic way of looking at the world (Pippi, childhood character), to the realistic and pessimistic grown up. So the title of the EP should be read in the context of that song. And regarding Nietzsche, well, he is well known to be notoriously misogynistic, so it is fairly difficult to call him a 'feminist', as you pointed out. However, in my interpretation of Beyond Good and Evil, with the death of God (master), people have to rise up and be their own masters (übermench). Without the authority and meaning of God, strong individuals need to rise up in the ocean of chaotic nihilism and make their own meaning and authority, lead their own lives, in a creative way. Due to Nietzsche's sister, this has been falsely been associated with the idea of a "stronger race" (as appropriated by Nazi Germany). Nietzsche was actually a strong opponent of anti-semitism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9Cbermensch. So, even if my way of using Pippi mainly as a symbol for naive adolescence, there's an übermench aspect to her in line with liberal feminism (although Nietzsche would never make this connection). And with the death of Pippi, you have to become your own super-version of Pippi, similar to Freud's idea of the 'super-ego' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id,_ego_a ... #Super-ego). This is a fairly complicated line of reasoning, and I which i could elaborate it in a more clear way. But in essence: Pippi is God, but that is a naive and false way of looking at life. When Pippi (God) dies, there are gonna be chaos, but after some time the adult rises and become their own Pippi (God).

I hope this made the connection between Pippi and Nietzsche a bit more clear (or perhaps it made it more unclear...)

Maybe i'll do a literary/philosophical analysis of the content of the EP once it is out!

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