Eventide's 50th Anniversary Flashback (DDL1745) and Rose/ EuroDDL Sale

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KVRist
107 posts since 6 Aug, 2019

Post Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:56 am

We are pleased to share with you our "Brief History of Time Delay" as we celebrate our 50th anniversary. Please click the link to learn all about our humble beginnings in 1971 and the first ever digital delay audio processor.

Here's a sneak peak at some of what you'll learn.
https://youtu.be/IhdHXFnEP-I

The first DDLs introduced professional audio to the advantages and possibilities of digital processing and now, nearly 50 years later, Digital Delay Lines still provide unique creative capabilities. Eventide’s product line includes two popular 21st-century DDLs, the EuroDDL and the Rose Pedal. Now for a limited time you can save $50 through February 28th, 2021! https://store.eventideaudio.com/pages/ddl-sale
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KVRist

Topic Starter

107 posts since 6 Aug, 2019

Post Mon Feb 22, 2021 10:02 am

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Today's Flashback is to our 1745A Digital Delay line!

The original DDL 1745 had one major shortcoming. Using the big switches to set delay would usually result in a dangerously loud pop/crackle/bzzzztttt. Engineers quickly learned to pull down the appropriate fader before changing delay. Richard took advantage of two new innovations—the shaft encoder and the Light Emitting Diode—to create the model DDL 1745A. Today, an encoder would be the logical choice but encoders were not yet commercially available (or, if they were, they were prohibitively expensive). Eventide designed its own encoder and the “Big Knob” was born. Turn it slowly for fine control or spin it quickly for large changes. The Big Knob has become a key control feature for many of Eventide’s products since that day in 1973.

The 1745A also featured an LED numerical display of the delay setting—likely the first display of its kind to find its way into a studio.
Please read all about it's history here: https://www.eventideaudio.com/blog/aagn ... 745a-delay

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User avatar
KVRist

Topic Starter

107 posts since 6 Aug, 2019

Post Thu Feb 25, 2021 9:08 am

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By 1975, integrated circuit technology had advanced to the point that Random Access Memory (RAM) chips became commercially available. For audio delay this was a game changer. Instead of being limited to shifting bits into one end of a delay line and waiting for the bits to emerge from the end of the line, audio could be ‘stored’ in memory and recalled at will. The 1745M was unlike anything that existed and for many, DDLs were still a mystery. Here’s how the Instruction Manual introduced it to audio pros and studio maintenance engineers: “...this is an unusual instruction manual”.
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READ THE ENTIRE BLOG HERE: https://www.eventideaudio.com/blog/aagn ... 745m-delay

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