Converted JUCE to American spelling

DSP, Plug-in and Host development discussion.
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scotchi
KVRer
18 posts since 1 Apr, 2018 from Berlin, Germany

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:51 am

I know that many folks have been troubled with the British spelling in JUCE. We created JUZE to use American spelling like virtually all other APIs. It works both on JUCE itself, and on full applications which use JUCE.

There's more info here on how we created the tool, as well as links to the source of the tool itself, and our JUCE fork here: https://decomposer.de/juze.html

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Rockatansky
KVRist
254 posts since 3 Jun, 2017

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:07 am

I see that British-isms in links were also translated... maybe wanna go over those RegExes again? ;)
Confucamus.

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scotchi
KVRer
18 posts since 1 Apr, 2018 from Berlin, Germany

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:25 am

Ah, true. Missed that. There's already support in the Ruby script for ignoring ranges (specifically there were a lot of false positives in base64 blocks, so it's there for that), so adding URL support wouldn't be hard.

quikquak
KVRist
424 posts since 6 Aug, 2005 from England

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:40 am

What the f**k does "British-isms" mean exactly? It's our language you're talking about it derogatory terms! Hey, why don't we ALL speak 'yankee-doodle,' it's the only way you 'mercuns' will understand us, hey y'all!!! :hihi: :x :hihi:

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syntonica
KVRist
442 posts since 25 Sep, 2014 from Specific Northwest

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:31 am

I thought JUCE was the American spelling of "juice". :wink:

stratum
KVRAF
2114 posts since 29 May, 2012

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:36 am

Lets try Esperanto so that everybody suffers equally :lol:
~stratum~

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syntonica
KVRist
442 posts since 25 Sep, 2014 from Specific Northwest

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:46 am

stratum wrote:Lets try Esperanto so that everybody suffers equally :lol:
Esperanto is based on Latin, so it's pretty easy for Westerners to learn. For shear torture, go for Lojban. :evil:

stratum
KVRAF
2114 posts since 29 May, 2012

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:49 am

syntonica wrote:
stratum wrote:Lets try Esperanto so that everybody suffers equally :lol:
Esperanto is based on Latin, so it's pretty easy for Westerners to learn. For shear torture, go for Lojban. :evil:

It is said that most European languages are similar but when I had tried learning German it was pretty close to torture. I guess there is an age for everything and mine isn't suitable.
~stratum~

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EvilDragon
KVRAF
17159 posts since 7 Jan, 2009 from Croatia

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:15 am

Well, Hungarian and Finnish are there to screw everything up. Nordic languages are also pretty different to other European languages despite being classified as "north germanic", it is actually more descended from old Norse and borrows from germanic.

stratum
KVRAF
2114 posts since 29 May, 2012

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:37 am

EvilDragon wrote:Well, Hungarian and Finnish are there to screw everything up. Nordic languages are also pretty different to other European languages despite being classified as "north germanic", it is actually more descended from old Norse and borrows from germanic.
I guess they might be our very distant relatives as both Hungarian and Finnish grammars show similar properties to Turkish. Probably all three are somehow related to the area surrounding the Ural mountains in some distant past, at least this is what they are called, 'Uralic' (in case of Turkish the language group is often called 'Ural-Altaic' - the parent group of Uralic and Altaic, for reasons I'm not familiar with).

That doesn't mean that it would be easier for me to learn either language, though. Learnability is more related to having a set of uniform rules instead of similarity. Unlike English, there were too many rule exceptions in German, that was what I had found to be difficult. In English such exceptions are mostly limited to the past tense forms of some verbs, which aren't many.
~stratum~

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EvilDragon
KVRAF
17159 posts since 7 Jan, 2009 from Croatia

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 11:07 am

Heh. English is probably one of most irregular languages out there. It's not just past tense forms of verbs, but spelling-wise it's quite shocking how many inconsistencies there are. Or spelling/pronunciation combos (though there aren't many of those. read/read, their/they're/there - this one absolutely raises my back hair when I see it misspelled, I'm not a native speaker but I know when to use which...)

German, by comparison, has a lot more structure (even though it also has irregular forms), but at least spelling-wise and word-formation-wise it's much more consistent. But yes, it is different enough to cause various degrees of pain on people who want to learn it. I didn't have many problems with it, but of course since I'm not using it I might as well start from square one... but I won't do that because I dislike German on pure "tone" of it. It just always sounds like everyone's pissed off ALL THE TIME when I hear Germans speaking. It's incredible. Hungarian is nearly the same, except it's like aliens are talking, and you just KNOW every second word they spout out is a swear word of some sort. (And I live like 20 km away from Hungarian border, LOL).


PS: Interesting discussion: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/239614 ... -languages

stratum
KVRAF
2114 posts since 29 May, 2012

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 11:39 am

English spelling is so irregular that I had just assumed that it was just arbitrary and there was nothing to learn about it. Word order is always the same (and therefore has no function other than syntax) and grammar is consistent if we don't count verb tense irregularities, and it's not an agglutinative language either, so basically there is nothing to learn about word formation i.e. I had just assumed that English had no new word formation capacity whatsoever (i.e. it appears to have no morphology, only syntax). Many languages are more complex than that, I guess only Esperanto could be simpler.
~stratum~

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syntonica
KVRist
442 posts since 25 Sep, 2014 from Specific Northwest

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:31 pm

EvilDragon wrote:Well, Hungarian and Finnish are there to screw everything up. Nordic languages are also pretty different to other European languages despite being classified as "north germanic", it is actually more descended from old Norse and borrows from germanic.
Don't diss the Finno-Ugrics! I love me some 27 cases and 53 moods! :lol:

I'm not sure how Turkish is similar as it agglutinates and has minimal cases, but I adore that language. :love:

I like German as it's hard to do double meanings as in English or Dutch--it's very exacting and technical. That must be why they sound angry all the time as jokes are hard to do. :wink:

Regarding English spelling, it's never been "reformed" like many other languages. Considering it was "standardized" by Chaucer who was trying to blend Old English with some version of French, each pronounced accordingly, it's not too bad. I think it's been judged at about 80% consistent, IIRC.

stratum
KVRAF
2114 posts since 29 May, 2012

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:41 pm

syntonica wrote: I'm not sure how Turkish is similar as it agglutinates and has minimal cases, but I adore that language. :love:
.
There is a very large group that does that
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agglutinative_language

Surprizingly the artificial language named Esperanto is in the list. I can consider that to be a design error if it was supposed to be 'easy to learn'. While the meaning of the words can be more predictable, it also means one has to learn the morphology of the langauge instead of just learning syntax. Unless it has very simple morphological rules by design this can be an obstacle. The same word can be found in different spellings and the learner would need to recognize them to be the ame word with different suffixes as in:

kitap -- book
kitabın -- your book
kitaplar -- books
kitaplarımız -- our books
kitaplaştıramadıklarımız -- the ones we couldn't make to be a book -- that's an incomplete sentence that needs to be parsed at a morphological level and the parser then needs to continue at the syntactic level. That's probably not much a problem for a spoken language parser (like a human brain hearing such a word) as it doesn't actually need to recognize word boundaries anyway as there are no spaces in a spoken language, but it may look confusing to a new learner. While there are theories of grammar for which the distinction between syntax and morphology is an artificial one, nevertheless, you wouldn't like to see such a word while learning a new language.
~stratum~

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scotchi
KVRer
18 posts since 1 Apr, 2018 from Berlin, Germany

Re: Converted JUCE to American spelling

Post Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:56 pm

Rockatansky wrote:I see that British-isms in links were also translated... maybe wanna go over those RegExes again? ;)
Fixed the URL substitution bug.

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