how big is yours? ( The M42 Astronomy Thread)

Sicklecell666
Banned
6127 posts since 1 Apr, 2004 from Et in Arcadia Ego

Post Wed Jul 28, 2004 8:12 am

sounds like your adaptations are classic do it yourselfer tricks that have been in use for many years..you're a natural!

I did the knob thing on my Dob as well, that was before they started building em with one.

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Wed Jul 28, 2004 9:58 am

sickle666 wrote:sounds like your adaptations are classic do it yourselfer tricks that have been in use for many years..you're a natural!

I did the knob thing on my Dob as well, that was before they started building em with one.
actually, I did the same thing with my old 4 1/4" Edmund Scientific Reflector, but I used a metal Shaver holder! :lol:

TC

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:29 pm

Hi All

I was looking forward to going camping this weekend ( Mt Madanna
State park, CA) Got my scope ready to go for my first look at dark
skies. The tripod would not fit in the car with our camping supplies,( although I did take it apart and it fit perfectly into my Yamaha Hardshell DX7 case :-)
so I was just going to bring the tube as it's a short tube reflector,
and use the "cradle" method to observe. While not the best especially
if you want to actually find specific objects, it still works, and it
was worth taking a chance.

Got into the mountians last nite...and a fog creeped up and covered
the whole mountain. WE were pretty much wet and damp the whole time.
Still had fun making a camp fire and having a few meals and looking
at the trees, but the we decided to pack it in, as it got just too
cold, and the fog was not going to let up.

Got back down into silicon valley with clear skies, so at least I can
observe from the backyard as usual. No place like Home...No place
like Home...:-)



TC

manytone
Mod-ulator
2889 posts since 31 Oct, 2000 from "Where I'm to, There I'll be"

Post Sat Jul 31, 2004 7:30 pm

Hey Tim
Cool to be in the mountains...
too bad about the fog..

As this thread is about scopes and space and M42 :D , I just want to say i put up a New Cd worth of Material in the Cafe that is my stuff that i make and mix for listening to while Telescoping. I Used alot of my new M42 in it!!! It is in Honor of the up and Coming Perseid Meteor Showers.

see Thread and get tunes here:

http://www.kvr-vst.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=634683

cheers
Paul
Image

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Sat Jul 31, 2004 10:07 pm

manytone wrote:Hey Tim
Cool to be in the mountains...
too bad about the fog..

As this thread is about scopes and space and M42 :D , I just want to say i put up a New Cd worth of Material in the Cafe that is my stuff that i make and mix for listening to while Telescoping. I Used alot of my new M42 in it!!! It is in Honor of the up and Coming Perseid Meteor Showers.

see Thread and get tunes here:

http://www.kvr-vst.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=634683

cheers
Paul

Hi Paul

I saw it and downloaded one of the songs so far ( the first one) as I am on dialup-it takes a while.

Very cool stuff...and great to go telescoping to! Just have to get new batteries for my Mp3 player:-)

Looking forward to these meteor showers however. Thye are predicting it might be pretty strong this year.Theres an article in Sky and Telescope about them in the AUG issue.

TC

DrAmbient
KVRist
97 posts since 26 Sep, 2003

Post Mon Aug 02, 2004 1:35 pm

manytone wrote:Hey Tim
Cool to be in the mountains...
too bad about the fog..

As this thread is about scopes and space and M42 :D , I just want to say i put up a New Cd worth of Material in the Cafe that is my stuff that i make and mix for listening to while Telescoping. I Used alot of my new M42 in it!!! It is in Honor of the up and Coming Perseid Meteor Showers.

see Thread and get tunes here:

http://www.kvr-vst.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=634683

cheers
Paul
This is really excellent material, Paul!
Hard to tell which piece I like the best...I can listen to this kind of 'spacescapes' for hours... :D

Guido

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Mon Aug 02, 2004 10:52 pm

Heres geeky me with my "super scope"

Image

Its a Stars and Scopes 6 EQ Reflector, short body, ( http://www.starsandscopes.com/starsands ... 9-6484.htm ) with a newly aquired Telrad Finder scope, a small refractor I got for a Xmas gift ( by my Mother -in Law who just passed away)which is piggybacked by bungy cable with a 6x30 finder scope attached. I added some more wieghts to counterbalance the refractor. You will also see a nice brass knob I installed to move the scope around when observing. The stand is actually pretty sturdy, and the EQ mount is not bad. Right now I have a 25MM and 10MM plossil eypieces. I use the 25MM the most however.Gives me 56 times, but the 6" is a pretty good light bucket and allows me to see a lot of cluster, nebula, planets, etc even in my light polluted skies.

anybody else with pics of thier Star Kit?

TC

Sicklecell666
Banned
6127 posts since 1 Apr, 2004 from Et in Arcadia Ego

Post Mon Aug 02, 2004 10:58 pm

Here's mine:

Image

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Mon Aug 02, 2004 11:06 pm

sickle666 wrote:Here's mine:

Image
hey...that would make a GRREAAAT GUI!..or..alternate controller!

TC

Sicklecell666
Banned
6127 posts since 1 Apr, 2004 from Et in Arcadia Ego

Post Mon Aug 02, 2004 11:10 pm

But seriosly folks, cool little rig there, Tim, like I said before, classic backyard modification, which is usually where you see cutting edge features in the 'alpha' stage. You're a gentleman in a gentleman's hobby, & I can't think of anything that better suits you. I'm glad if anything I shared with you over those emails helped in any way for you to enjoy observing more.

Hone your talents & you'll be the proud new inventor of the Astro-Bungie! Entrepenuerism is an American standard!

I see a great potential to corner the market here :D

Thanks for the cool thread in your company forum, btw :)

edit: yeah I know, I spelled entrepeunenrisme all wrong..I can't be arsed over that one :shock:

Hengy
KVRist
199 posts since 19 Sep, 2002

Post Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:18 pm

tim, i can see your telrad :shock:
fitted mine, it is a nice little beastie isn't it, pity we've had clouds, and today a thunderstorm, ever since i installed it :x :lol:
i've also been trying out a philips toucam pro as an astrocam, but so far bog-all to report or show i'm afraid :cry: will post if and when

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:33 pm

Hengy wrote:tim, i can see your telrad :shock:
fitted mine, it is a nice little beastie isn't it, pity we've had clouds, and today a thunderstorm, ever since i installed it :x :lol:
i've also been trying out a philips toucam pro as an astrocam, but so far bog-all to report or show i'm afraid :cry: will post if and when

AHH..NOW YOUR A TELRADer! Its the best thing I got for my scope. Sorry about your weather..we all have to endure it once in a while. :cry: .just waiting for that perfect clear night! :-o :shock:

Looks light tonight might be clear for me..but last night looked like it was gonna rain. Weird weather patterns we are having.

But now I want to try listening to Nebula tunes while star gazing. Might be more fun as well.
Sometimes while observing a satillite cames into the FOV and I follow it as far as I'm able with space music in my head as I do it.Quite fun, and found out ( on the Astronomy-on-line forum at yahoo) that this is a pastetime of ameture astronomy: Tracking satilltes. The trick is to get the FOV ahead of it, have it go past, then get ahead of it again, tracking it as far as you can.

If you get your cam stuff to work, please post a pic.



TC

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Wed Aug 04, 2004 10:17 pm

BOOK REVIEW


I think I may have mentioned this before in seperate posts, but right now at Barnes and Noble , you can get two excellent books in the bargan book section

1.A Guide to Advanced Skywatching by Robert Burham, Alan Dyer, Robert Garfinkle, Martin George, Jeff Kanipe, and David H. Levy. Some of these authors names could be from the "whos who" in astronomical literature. For example Robert Garfinkle wrote " Star-Hopping Your visa in veiwing the universe" and it's appropreiate that he wrote the Star Hopping sections in this guide.

This oversized and colorful books contains modern information on using telescopes, binoculars, info on planets, our solar system, Stars, Galaxies, Nebulas, a bit of History, as well as a pretty good Star hopping section with detailed maps to the 8th magnitude by Will Tirion.( Star Atlas 2000 and more) In addition there are colorful little "inserts" with tidbits of info which makes it an ejoyable read. However the Star hopping section is what makes it practical.Theres are 20 star hops, with detailed information on each object visited with colorful photos of the objects. For $10.00 ( originally $29.95) this is a good deal and should be welcomed in any backyard astronomers library.

2.Astronomy The definitive Guide by Robert Burnham, Alan Dyer,and Jeff Kanipe, with maps by Wil Tirion. Seems like some of the same authors in this book as the above book, but looking at it section by section , all the content is different, and the two books compliment one another very well. Included in this guide are monthly sky charts for each hemisphere in addition to a star hopping guide ( here called Star Tours) In addition, there is a section covering some of the major celestriel objects in detail with an eye piece impression as well.Each of the sections are color coded for easy access within the book itself. This is a feild guide as well as an armchair referance, atractivly bound in a good size( a little larger then the Peterson Field guides for example) which makes it easy to take in the field ( or your backyard !) I love the quote on the back: "Ten years from now,I expect many proffesional and amateur astronomers to trace thier passion for the feild back to this book" I would have eaten this book alive if I was kid and just getting into astronomy and so I can relate. I am eating it right now, and I really like the flavour. Highly recommended! a good deal for $12.00.

So for about $25.00 ( with tax) you can get two excellent referances that compliment one another and would make excellent additions to any backyard Starmans library. I have been enjoying them emmensly and also trying out some of the starhopps.A pactical, yet very fun guide to the universe!

TC

tconrardy
R.I.P.
3833 posts since 8 Sep, 2003 from Santa Clara, CA, USA

Post Fri Aug 06, 2004 10:04 am

well..I decided. I am getting the large 15x70 skymaster binocs from celestron

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/de ... 8&v=glance

don't know if that link will work. But I got it from Amazon since we already had an account with them and it was the best price. Also getting some celestron star charts bundled with it. Total was $81.00. Not too bad for some giant binocs. I intend to mount this on a tripod. ..so I know what I am getting into. But if you want to just hand hold binocs, get 10x50's or as Donavan sugged: a 9x63. I just could not bypass a chance to get some LARGE binocs for some comet hunting!

TC

DrAmbient
KVRist
97 posts since 26 Sep, 2003

Post Sat Aug 07, 2004 1:01 pm

tconrardy wrote:BOOK REVIEW


I think I may have mentioned this before in seperate posts, but right now at Barnes and Noble , you can get two excellent books in the bargan book section

1.A Guide to Advanced Skywatching by Robert Burham, Alan Dyer, Robert Garfinkle, Martin George, Jeff Kanipe, and David H. Levy. Some of these authors names could be from the "whos who" in astronomical literature. For example Robert Garfinkle wrote " Star-Hopping Your visa in veiwing the universe" and it's appropreiate that he wrote the Star Hopping sections in this guide.

This oversized and colorful books contains modern information on using telescopes, binoculars, info on planets, our solar system, Stars, Galaxies, Nebulas, a bit of History, as well as a pretty good Star hopping section with detailed maps to the 8th magnitude by Will Tirion.( Star Atlas 2000 and more) In addition there are colorful little "inserts" with tidbits of info which makes it an ejoyable read. However the Star hopping section is what makes it practical.Theres are 20 star hops, with detailed information on each object visited with colorful photos of the objects. For $10.00 ( originally $29.95) this is a good deal and should be welcomed in any backyard astronomers library.

TC
Hey! That's funny. I just bought the same book (but here in Holland, and translated to Dutch) for only 9 euros!
:!:

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