So....how's your Kore?

Plug-in hosts and other software applications discussion
theoryzero
KVRist
146 posts since 3 Mar, 2006

Post Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:53 am

Released? Yes, but some will argue it is still in beta. ;-)

I've been using it for a few weeks. It adds a chunk of overhead on my older P4 2.8 GHz system so it isn't really useable for me in my sequencer environment. However, I've been having fun playing with sounds in the library and making assignments. Hopefully a new patch will iron out the excessive CPU usage problems that seem to come with having the controller connected.

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pdxindy
KVRAF
13888 posts since 3 Feb, 2005 from in the wilds

Post Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:06 pm

I would not want to save my synth patches in KORE. Then I would not be able to use them without KORE. I don't want to be that dependent on it. I want to save my presets for a synth, in that synth, with its midi mapping.

I have no trouble in my current system setting up controller modulation. It is fast and easy.

KORE uses precious system resources and it does not offer that much unless you are just starting out and don't have an audio interface or any midi controller with some knobs. It is a good idea in theory, but this sort of functionality should be in the host and not add an extra layer of complexity.

I use Live and I can just drag one or more midi clips on multiple tracks into the browser and they are saved with all synths and effects (Ableton and 3rd party). In the current version of Live you can save device chains but is currently limited to only Ableton plug-ins not 3rd party ones. I expect when Live6 beta is released it will allow all devices (maybe not). A little tweeking to this functionality and KORE is redundant.

No doubt some people will find KORE useful, but a few years from now it will be a dinosaur as hosts and external controllers are becoming much more fluent.

Sascha Franck
KVRAF
12420 posts since 14 Nov, 2000 from Hannover / Germany

Post Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:37 pm

pdxindy wrote:and it does not offer that much unless you are just starting out and don't have an audio interface or any midi controller with some knobs. It is a good idea in theory, but this sort of functionality should be in the host and not add an extra layer of complexity.


This is what most people seem to misinterprete.
I am in NO way saying that anybody would *need* KORE, and I'm the first to admit that both the CPU consumption and the fact that you need the controller as a dongle MUST be adressed.
But: From a conceptional point of view, KORE is something entirely different than whatever host with whatever MIDI controller.
Yes, you can setup something remotely similar in hosts like Energy XT, allowing for massive MIDI routings, coming along with MIDI learn and what not. Yet, there's NO WAY to have all the plugin parameters and your knobs interact! This is only partially possible with control devices a la Mackie Control - but we all know that it's something entirely different.

In addition, from how I see it, KORE is also aiming a lot at the live playing musician.
Now, with the controller, you only need to open your laptop once - for booting that is.
After that you just close the lid, hide the machine in a rack caddy and use the KORE controller for anything else. You can instantly load all patches you ever wish and the controller layout will remain consistent. All this is entirely impossible with a host and a plain MIDI controller.
Even *if* you could manage to route the same controller to the same (or similar) plugin parameter after you've changed instruments, you'll still have parameter jumps each time you touch a knob for the first time, as the feedback is missing. Not so with KORE - any controller movement will instantly start at the point the parameter was set to.

As said, I'm not saying KORE is a must for anybody - but the key functionalities can't be replicated with whatever host and whatever MIDI controller.
There are 3 kinds of people:
Those who can do maths and those who can't.

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