Good DAW for teaching on Linux / under Wine?

Plug-in hosts and other software applications discussion
elementalist
KVRer
3 posts since 25 Apr, 2005

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:07 am

Hi all

I'm in charge of choosing software for a youth music project at a community arts centre. Funding is limited, and also the computers are running linux.

I've already installed and used FL Studio under Wine for a course over the summer. Its a good one to teach with but I'd like to look into other options. I would love to use Ableton but a) its expensive and b) does not seem to run under Wine.

The IT guy wants to use native free/open source linux software but everything I've looked at looks a bit flaky, or is unstable on other platforms. I want these young people to learn something solid and transferable, so they can go home and use it, or their mates house, or even a music studio - I want to be teaching transferable skills/knowledge.


Current contenders are:
  • Reaper - highly respected, cheap, runs well under Wine - steep learning curve

    FL Studio - well known, easy to learn, runs under Wine - not as "pro" and fiddly with complex arrangements and recording

    Renoise - native linux, intuitive tracker interface, strong following - tracker interface might put some people off

    Studio One - runs under Wine, intuitive workflow, all in one -

    Tracktion - native linux also, looking into this one ...
Any tips, suggestions, experience, much appreciated!

Debby747
KVRist
272 posts since 18 Dec, 2007 from Germany

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:21 am

Check out Ardour (http://ardour.org/), a native Linux DAW :-)

Greetings
D.
"There's a certain detail seen here."

pc999
KVRian
1431 posts since 19 Aug, 2009

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:29 am

I can use Reaper under Wine, well enough, only the 32 bits version, FLStudio also runs well enough it but both will easly bring your latency way too way for recording complex stuff with VST enabled, at least in a onboard soundcard.


Renoise (native Linux) runs very, very well, way better than on Windows.

The same can be said for Tracktion4 (it had some minor bugs but I think it is ok now).


But give a try at the native and open source LMMS, Ardour 3 or Qtraction, are a bit harder to use but very nice stuff.

You have a Ubuntu studio package and a KXstudio too, they will do much of the hard work.


Edit: just a minor correction
Last edited by pc999 on Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

elementalist
KVRer

Topic Starter

3 posts since 25 Apr, 2005

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:31 am

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Thanks, however was put off by reading that sidechaining is either impossible or complicated in Ardour...
Debby747 wrote:Check out Ardour (http://ardour.org/ (http://ardour.org/)), a native Linux DAW :-)

Greetings
D.

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pljones
KVRAF
6847 posts since 8 Feb, 2003 from London, UK

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:45 pm

elementalist wrote:I want these young people to learn something solid and transferable, so they can go home and use it, or their mates house, or even a music studio - I want to be teaching transferable skills/knowledge.
In which case explain what the techniques are and what they are for. The skills should be transferable to any toolset. Indeed, if you can demonstrate on several different studios, this will emphasise the point that the tool isn't what's important, it's the person using it.

I can't add to the list, though.

chk071
KVRAF
30681 posts since 11 Apr, 2010 from Germany

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:55 pm

Won't you need licenses for every single computer then? Just wondering...

elementalist
KVRer

Topic Starter

3 posts since 25 Apr, 2005

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 1:08 pm

Yes but there are educational / multi-user discounts for a lot of them, and we do have budget, not sure about up to £400 I think, max 6-7 computers.
chk071 wrote:Won't you need licenses for every single computer then? Just wondering...

chk071
KVRAF
30681 posts since 11 Apr, 2010 from Germany

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 1:43 pm

Alright. :)

jeffh
KVRian
508 posts since 9 Feb, 2012

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:39 pm

Depending on exactly what you are teaching, PyDAW might suit your needs. It's solely aimed at dance music, and does lack some features that would be essential for recording a rock band or composing classical music.

If that doesn't turn you off, I dare say that it's the most stable open source DAW in all of Linux. It comes with a complete set of synth/sampler/effects plugins, so you won't need install anything else to use it...

Screenshots:

http://www.kvraudio.com/product/pydaw-by-pydaw
http://sourceforge.net/projects/libmodsynth/

Downloads:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/libmods ... es/pydaw4/

killmaster
KVRAF
1957 posts since 5 Oct, 2003

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:20 pm

I vote Tracktion.
Last edited by killmaster on Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

killmaster
KVRAF
1957 posts since 5 Oct, 2003

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:24 pm

Tracktion! I've used the others. You really can't beat it for ease of use without sacrificing too much depth. I would think this is ideal
Software for teaching

pc999
KVRian
1431 posts since 19 Aug, 2009

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 4:38 pm

I forgot about PyDaw :oops: (probably the most Live like in some matters, as far as possible in others too)

BTW about Live on wine
http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.p ... ngId=76385

jeffh
KVRian
508 posts since 9 Feb, 2012

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 4:58 pm

pc999 wrote: I forgot about PyDaw :oops: (probably the most Live like in some matters, as far as possible in others too)

Shame on you for not mentioning PyDAW :x :D

I had to come in and promote myself like nobody else likes it enough to mention it :hihi:

In all seriousness though, the brand-new PyDAWv4 release added a ton of nice stuff... It's still very much a tracker-like beat-machine, but it's getting very refined and mature, especially the built-in plugins.

tooneba
KVRAF
1524 posts since 6 Nov, 2012

Post Tue Nov 19, 2013 8:12 pm

FL Studio
-easy to learn
-fiddly with complex arrangements
Hmmm I'd rather think it's opposite. For instance, it's not as easy as traditional linear daw because it won't baby sitter the linking between lane-channel-mixer-automations. On the other hand this brings benefits in complex arrangements. Several channel synth's riff in a clip, cut, mute & preserve it on the time line, reuse, etc.

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dformd
KVRian
517 posts since 20 Dec, 2008

Post Wed Nov 20, 2013 7:53 am

I looooove Renoise, HOWEVER, I've run music workshops using it, and know it can sometimes be perceived as bafflingly computer-programmer oriented or antiquated looking; BUT I believe it can be introduced as an EXTREMELY progressive, wildly versatile, user-friendly, well-designed, and cost-effective alternative to many of the big-hitters on the market.

NEVERTHELESS, I suggest also playing with (if you haven't) and considering the multi-platform (Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, PalmOS, and MeeGo) Sunvox, as I would describe it in a similar fashion to how I described Renoise (above), though the two programs are in fact VERY different in many, pronounced ways.

Actually, as much as I love Renoise, I suspect Sunvox's flexible modular interface may come across to many people as more intuitive than the interface of Renoise, and I dare say, many other DAWs; FLStudio included.

http://www.warmplace.ru/soft/sunvox/

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