distance notes - counting distance mistake?

Chords, scales, harmony, melody, etc.
KVRer
8 posts since 2 Sep, 2021

Post Thu Sep 16, 2021 7:20 am

At the video's link at the specific time: https://youtu.be/anxHT-a9FHU?t=1012

If I count above 2 intervals, the ditances would be 10 and 8 (C to C)
But according to to a you tuber, it must be a 3rd and 8th? How can that be an 3rd? I really count 10 notes distance.

KVRist
233 posts since 4 Aug, 2020 from Montreal, Canada

Post Thu Sep 16, 2021 10:01 am

I checked 10:12, but didn't understand your question.

In the example he was drawing:
C to G = a perfect 5th
A to E = a perfect 5th + an octave

Can you elaborate?

KVRer

Topic Starter

8 posts since 2 Sep, 2021

Post Thu Sep 16, 2021 11:35 am

Time 16:40..... the link does not jump to correct time. I am sorry.

How can the left be an interval of a 3rd and the right one be an interval of an octave...
I thought the right interval of 10 steps.

KVRist
233 posts since 4 Aug, 2020 from Montreal, Canada

Post Thu Sep 16, 2021 2:15 pm

No worries!

On his example:
F to A = major 3rd + an octave
C to C = an octave

So I guess your question is, why do we consider "major 3rd + an octave" the same thing as a "major 3rd"?

Good question... I don't really know :p

KVRer

Topic Starter

8 posts since 2 Sep, 2021

Post Fri Sep 17, 2021 9:52 am

Many thanks!

Anyone know?

User avatar
KVRian
809 posts since 4 Feb, 2021

Post Fri Sep 17, 2021 10:08 am

Have not seen the vid, but as intervals a third and a third + octave are not the same. 3 steps in a diatonic scale do not equal 10. However, as triads, serving harmonic functions, they serve the same function. E.g. If you have a F major triad as tonic, its function won’t change just because you transpose its bass note F down an octave. Will just give your basic triad another color. So different intervals, same harmonical function.
Tribe Of Hǫfuð https://soundcloud.com/user-228690154 "First rule: From one perfect consonance to another perfect consonance one must proceed in contrary or obligue motion." Johann Joseph Fux 1725.

KVRer
14 posts since 20 Mar, 2021

Post Tue Oct 05, 2021 3:37 pm

lionlion wrote:
Thu Sep 16, 2021 11:35 am
Time 16:40..... the link does not jump to correct time. I am sorry.
clicking on the URL (instead of the embed) takes us to 16:52, which is your 1012 seconds as the URL reads

KVRist
92 posts since 26 Mar, 2017

Post Wed Oct 06, 2021 5:53 am

shawshawraw wrote:
Thu Sep 16, 2021 2:15 pm
So I guess your question is, why do we consider "major 3rd + an octave" the same thing as a "major 3rd"?

Good question... I don't really know :p
Unless I'm misunderstanding the context, it's about octave equivalence.

I suppose that subject can fill a topic in itself, if looked at from various angles.

KVRist
111 posts since 14 Jan, 2020

Post Wed Oct 06, 2021 6:52 am

yeah it's technically a 10th, but it can be tedious to label compound intervals when looking at these 2 voice moves, since the main concern is differentiating between types of consonances and dissonances. e.g. 3rds and 5ths and 6ths and octaves are *generally* going to be treated the same as 10ths and 12ths and 13ths and (ew) 15ths, as far as basic rules for dealing with parallels or direct motion go.

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