RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

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Brandon203113
KVRist
56 posts since 25 Sep, 2018

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:29 am

I understand Peak compression and RMS compression both, but i would like some examples of how people typically use RMS compression??? I always use peak and get the desired effect i'm looking for dynamic-wise, but when would i use RMS for a better result instead???

IIRs
KVRAF
6735 posts since 25 Mar, 2002 from sheffield, england

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:43 am

The M in RMS means you have to take the average of a window of samples. The result depends very much on the size of that window...

Eg, if the window is just one sample (extreme example) the result will be identical to peak sensing.

With a 2ms window you'll still have fast, grabby compression, but with a slightly rounder, pillowier effect on transients.

At 30ms transients will hardly be affected, but you can dig down into the body of the part and make it more solidity consistent in level.

Stamped Records
KVRist
79 posts since 20 Sep, 2018 from UK

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:49 pm

Could you provide real world examples of when you might choose to use either mode?

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Scrubbing Monkeys
KVRian
657 posts since 21 Apr, 2017 from Bahia, Brazil

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:05 pm

Stamped Records wrote:
Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:49 pm
Could you provide real world examples of when you might choose to use either mode?
to

A vocal track where you want to level out the overall volume but dont want to affect the transients too much.

Say you have a rock vocal that is not very fast but punchy. The singer wasnt consistent with distance from the mic causing fluctuations in volume. Rms would be a good choice here.

kinda like a slow attack but better in this case because it uses the average of a specific window in time.

Same with say bass play that is inconsistent with their string attack.

You dont want to kill the transient s but controll the overall level. The window size would depend on how busy the track was.

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Scrubbing Monkeys
KVRian
657 posts since 21 Apr, 2017 from Bahia, Brazil

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:09 pm

Peak is better suited for bursts of sound. Drums, staccato strings, rap voacals maybe. things that dont sustain long. or...when you want to crush something and use parallel compression.

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Scrubbing Monkeys
KVRian
657 posts since 21 Apr, 2017 from Bahia, Brazil

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:12 pm

Once you get a feel for it. Using something like ReaComp or TDR Kontilikov allows you to do both at the same time. Which is good for program material.

Brandon203113
KVRist
56 posts since 25 Sep, 2018

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:04 pm

I'm sorry, scrubbing monkeys, what do you mean by "program material?" and okay i think i kind of understand now, so just use it on either sustained long notes of stuff or use it on things you dont really want peaks affected on???

MrMagneto
KVRist
479 posts since 6 Nov, 2010

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:46 pm

peak compression for sound shaping
rms compression for leveling (maybe pads or a strings section or a voice)

camsr
KVRAF
6914 posts since 17 Feb, 2005

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:48 am

RMS compression is generally helpful for managing volume level, when without the ability to make finer corrections.
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Scrubbing Monkeys
KVRian
657 posts since 21 Apr, 2017 from Bahia, Brazil

Re: RMS compression Vs Peak Compression

Post Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:02 am

Brandon203113 wrote:
Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:04 pm
I'm sorry, scrubbing monkeys, what do you mean by "program material?" and okay i think i kind of understand now, so just use it on either sustained long notes of stuff or use it on things you dont really want peaks affected on???

Program material usually refers to a full mix where there are multiple sound sources.

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