What are you listening to now? Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!

Anything about MUSIC but doesn't fit into the forums above.
KVRist
309 posts since 25 Aug, 2019

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:42 am


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KVRAF
9977 posts since 13 Mar, 2009 from UK

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:58 am

PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
seismic1 wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 8:19 am
Ry Cooder - Bop Till You Drop
Great Album.

The first fully digital recording, the engineers didn't want to use compressors or EQs in order to maintain the "purity of digital recording".
I didn't realise that. I thought "digital" albums first appeared around '82.
PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
I was surprised to find the guitar work was split between Ry Cooder and David Lindley with both intertwining rhythm parts together, great combo.
Watch out, King Crimson :)
PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
Other amazing musicians include:
Tim Drummond – bass guitar
Jim Keltner – drums
Chaka Khan – vocals
Rev. Patrick Henderson – organ, keyboards
I always like Keltner's work with Cooder. His body of work is enormous. He recently worked on the soundtrack for "The Irishman". The "collaborations" list on the Wikipedia page is incomplete!

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KVRAF
5074 posts since 30 Apr, 2019

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:04 am

seismic1 wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:58 am
I always like Keltner's work with Cooder. His body of work is enormous. He recently worked on the soundtrack for "The Irishman". The "collaborations" list on the Wikipedia page is incomplete!
First time I noticed him was he played on Elvis Costello’s King of America album.

KVRer
5 posts since 18 Feb, 2021

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:29 am


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KVRAF
9977 posts since 13 Mar, 2009 from UK

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:36 am

The Crimson Jazz Trio - King Crimson Songbook Volume 1

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KVRian
905 posts since 2 Aug, 2004 from Sweden

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:03 pm

Nad Sylvan - When The music Dies

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KVRian
905 posts since 2 Aug, 2004 from Sweden

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:45 pm

Steve Hackett - Star Of Sirius

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KVRian
905 posts since 2 Aug, 2004 from Sweden

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:56 pm

Steve Thorne - Every Second Counts

D.H. MOD
13602 posts since 21 Jun, 2008

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:10 pm

Kris Davis - Duopoly

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KVRAF
5302 posts since 13 Nov, 2012

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:55 pm

seismic1 wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:58 am
PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
seismic1 wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 8:19 am
Ry Cooder - Bop Till You Drop
Great Album.

The first fully digital recording, the engineers didn't want to use compressors or EQs in order to maintain the "purity of digital recording".
I didn't realise that. I thought "digital" albums first appeared around '82.
PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
I was surprised to find the guitar work was split between Ry Cooder and David Lindley with both intertwining rhythm parts together, great combo.
Watch out, King Crimson :)
PatchAdamz wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:31 pm
Other amazing musicians include:
Tim Drummond – bass guitar
Jim Keltner – drums
Chaka Khan – vocals
Rev. Patrick Henderson – organ, keyboards
I always like Keltner's work with Cooder. His body of work is enormous. He recently worked on the soundtrack for "The Irishman". The "collaborations" list on the Wikipedia page is incomplete!
From Wikipedia:

"Bop Till You Drop is Ry Cooder's eighth album, released in 1979. The album was the first digitally recorded major-label album in popular music. Bop Till You Drop was recorded on a digital 32-track machine built by 3M."

So yea, its "the first digitally recorded major-label album in popular music...."
Mmm, makes me wonder what the first fully digital album was in any genre.

Jim Keltner is an amazing drummer, he has been on a ton of great recordings including George Harrison: Living in the Material World.

On the back cover of that same record underneath the second hand-print design, text provides details of the fictitious Jim Keltner Fan Club where information which was available by sending a "stamped undressed elephant" to Jim Keltners address...

Keltner talking about it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WiLW41qufw

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KVRAF
5074 posts since 30 Apr, 2019

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:08 pm

PatchAdamz wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:55 pm
Mmm, makes me wonder what the first fully digital album was in any genre.
I would guess it’d be some sort of experimental thing from Sony as they came out with the first PCM recorders which were I think a bit like VCRs that would record/play digital data. That was only a year or two before that Ry Cooder album.

I seem to recall everyone making a fuss about Blue Nile for being DDD, but I’m not sure why they’d stand out a number of years later.

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KVRAF
5302 posts since 13 Nov, 2012

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:21 pm

WatchTheGuitar wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 5:08 pm
PatchAdamz wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:55 pm
Mmm, makes me wonder what the first fully digital album was in any genre.

 
I would guess it’d be some sort of experimental thing from Sony as they came out with the first PCM recorders which were I think a bit like VCRs that would record/play digital data. That was only a year or two before that Ry Cooder album.

I seem to recall everyone making a fuss about Blue Nile for being DDD, but I’m not sure why they’d stand out a number of years later.

 
After some research here is the first one:

January 1971: Using NHK's experimental PCM recording system, Dr. Takeaki Anazawa, an engineer at Denon, records the world's first commercial digital recordings, The World Of Stomu Yamash'ta 1 & 2 by Stomu Yamash'ta (January 11, 1971)

I worked on the first fully sampled recording (engineered and sampled) using Stevie Wonders Synclavier. That is now in the Smithsonian Museum (not full album).

Entroducing (1996) by DJ Shadow, a.k.a name Joshua Davis (USA) was the first album to be recorded using only sampled sounds.

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KVRAF
5074 posts since 30 Apr, 2019

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 6:17 pm

Indeed, the first commercial digital recording was Nippon Columbia NCB-7003, "Something" by Steve Marcus, released January 1971.The only other commercial release to come out of these early Denon/NHK recordings was Nippon Columbia NCC-8004, "The World of Sutomu Yamashita," according to Anazawa."
Yay google

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KVRAF
1617 posts since 15 Oct, 2017 from U.S.

Post Tue Feb 23, 2021 7:03 pm

Siouxsie & the Banshees - The Killing Jar

KVRAF
3995 posts since 22 Nov, 2012

Post Wed Feb 24, 2021 1:23 pm

xlr8r 295 is one of the toughest things i've ever tried to type, and one of the toughest sets i ever heard. djpauljohnson

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