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elassi
KVRAF
 
1891 posts since 8 Sep, 2009
Spent the last weekend investigating several methods to separate the kick and the bass. In former times me only used the classic sidechain-method but since "Trackspacer" and the like entered my focus I was curious to hear the differences and/or disadvantages of all the techniques at hand.

Did thorough tests with (among others) MeldaEverything, Equivocate, any SC-capable compressor in my plugin-folder and also some handmade solutions (automation, that is).

Today, opened the various sessions again, hoping to rely on fresh ears, but still have no idea which trick tastes better. :borg:

It'd be great if you guys share your opinions and experiences. Probably I missed something (read: did something wrong).
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AsPeeXXXVIII
KVRist
 
309 posts since 17 Aug, 2015, from Finland
I mean it's ultimately up to you to decide. But on a quick note, compressing the "different ends" of the two instruments with multiband compression might be another possibility worth looking into.
"Creativity is a lot like sex. When it's spontaneous, it's good, but forcing it makes it bad."
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elassi
KVRAF
 
1891 posts since 8 Sep, 2009
Thx, but I'm afraid I don't understand what you mean. Do you mind to elaborate a bit more on this? Thank you. :)
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AsPeeXXXVIII
KVRist
 
309 posts since 17 Aug, 2015, from Finland
I'm going to assume you know the basics of how a compressor functions. A multiband compressor is basically a compressor, but instead of the entire frequency range, you can choose to compress specific frequencies. In your case, for instance, you could compress the kick around the 50-200Hz area and the bass around the 500-2,000Hz area.

Do note that those are just random numbers I pulled off the top of my head. You can obviously compress either instrument in any frequency range depending on your own preference.
"Creativity is a lot like sex. When it's spontaneous, it's good, but forcing it makes it bad."
My metal music | My electronic music
elassi
KVRAF
 
1891 posts since 8 Sep, 2009
Ah, I see what you mean though I can't imagine how this would solve the problem of conflicting frequencies in the low end (taking into account that you just make one part of the conflicting sound "stronger" which - in my opinion - only adds to the problem). However, I'll try this because hearing is better than believing. ;)
koonig
KVRer
 
5 posts since 4 Jul, 2014
Can you clarify what you mean by separating kick and bass. What is your specific problem.
The simplest solution would clearly be putting the bass only on the off-beats but i guess that wouldn't work for your style
elassi
KVRAF
 
1891 posts since 8 Sep, 2009
My "problem" (as well as common solutions) is written in the first post.

I'd like to hear opinions on the various methods or - alternatively - how other people deal with it.

Is my english that bad? :?
adl
KVRian
 
1020 posts since 26 Jun, 2005
Bought Trackspacer after some testing, I think it's doing a good job and is also quiet easy to set up, compared to all the other technics you described. I also like the fact, that only specific frequencys get out of the way, not the whole spectrum as of you would get with classic Sidechaining.
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Samplecraze
KVRist
 
292 posts since 9 Aug, 2004
Although side-chaining works wonders for alternating frequencies maybe you should try automation for fine tuning?
MogwaiBoy
KVRAF
 
2698 posts since 26 Nov, 2015, from Way Downunder
If you're just wanting to duck amplitude, not specific frequencies - the best method for me is sending those channels to a bus and then creating a simple volume automation on the bus fader. In FL Studio you can create a little mini automation curve on the Playlist and then just duplicate/drag it wherever you want it to go (on the kick and/or snare usually).

If you want frequency ducking then yep, lots of methods - but again, say, automating the mix control on Pro-Q 2.. is pretty easy.

Automation method gives you full control of everything btw - you are not beholden to a compressor's limitations (attack time etc).
Samplecraze
KVRist
 
292 posts since 9 Aug, 2004
Whereas I use automation for fine tuning gains and s'c for very specific ducking chores I now use dynamic eqs more and more. I love the TDR Nova GE and use this to duck one frequency range whilst peaking another. Works great in controlling the low end mayhem.

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