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Mathematics
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276 posts since 10 Sep, 2015, from You haven't unlocked this character yet

Postby Mathematics; Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:03 pm Re: Expanders!

Tearing, right. It's attenuated "to" 1/3 of the original amplitude and not "by" 1/3. I'll make the correction.

My answer, based on the aforementioned concepts, is normal compression of 5:1 based off the inherent double negation.
...and the electron responded, "what wall?"
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Mathematics
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276 posts since 10 Sep, 2015, from You haven't unlocked this character yet

Postby Mathematics; Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:39 pm Re: Expanders!

By the way, I know we all know how to use compressors and understand what the result is without the math involved. I wrote that for noobs, because there was time that I would read a conversation because I was interested in the topic but wasn't familiar with.the concepts. Like you guys, I remember a time not having any idea about compressors.

On the topic, it was stated by someone that compressors make the louder parts quieter and the softer parts louder. From what I've studied, the loudest parts were attenuated by a circuit causing the overall amplitude to be a little more level. Then an amplifier was integrated to restore the audio to the perceived loudness.

Was there ever a hardware compressor that both compressed and expanded simultaneously?
...and the electron responded, "what wall?"
ghettosynth
KVRAF
 
11097 posts since 13 Oct, 2009

Postby ghettosynth; Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:58 pm Re: Expanders!

Mathematics wrote:By the way, I know we all know how to use compressors and understand what the result is without the math involved. I wrote that for noobs, because there was time that I would read a conversation because I was interested in the topic but wasn't familiar with.the concepts. Like you guys, I remember a time not having any idea about compressors.


Awesome!

On the topic, it was stated by someone that compressors make the louder parts quieter and the softer parts louder. From what I've studied, the loudest parts were attenuated by a circuit causing the overall amplitude to be a little more level. Then an amplifier was integrated to restore the audio to the perceived loudness.


And upward compression amplifies quiet signals so that they're close in volume to the louder signals. Practically, it should be immediately clear that this will tend to have less of a coloring effect as it's working on the quieter signals.


Was there ever a hardware compressor that both compressed and expanded simultaneously?



I'm sure that this is not what you mean, but, a "compander" is a circuit used for noise reduction that uses both a compressor and an expander.

https://electricdruid.net/noise-reducti ... ompanders/

I can perhaps see some advantage to downward compression and expansion happening at the same time. You preserve the dynamic range but color the peaks. I seem to recall this same conversation happening elsewhere, but I don't feel like looking for it right now.
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Mathematics
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276 posts since 10 Sep, 2015, from You haven't unlocked this character yet

Postby Mathematics; Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:47 pm Re: Expanders!

I have to admit, this is the first time I've been introduced to the Compander.

It turns out to a bit different than what I intuitively thought in context to our conversation but how it affects sound is actually quite an interesting technique.

Thanks for that.
...and the electron responded, "what wall?"
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