Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

How to make that sound...
perpetual3
KVRist
499 posts since 28 Sep, 2012

Post Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:41 am

I’m just getting started into mid-side processing to help give my mixes more dimension and space. I was wondering if anybody here has any insight, tips or advice for using mid side to enhance big, cavernous reverb or smoky, degrading delays and echos.

I’ve got the free bx solo plugin and PSP e27 for mid - side processing.

CHOOS
KVRist
141 posts since 3 Nov, 2010

Re: Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

Post Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:10 pm

the free MSED from Voxengo is a simple Mid-Side effect

The main thing to keep in mind is that the side disappears when you play your song in mono
Depending on the genre of music this is less or more important.

When I want to make sure my mix sounds right when I sum to mono is have the mid and side on separate channels and roughly match the tone of the two so that when it's mono it doesn't sound like it missing highs or lows
Sometimes making it mono can really kill the sound you made to begin with so on some elements you want to check this often.

A lot of stereo making plug-ins nowadays are really good so sometimes a mono sound is enough to begin with.
Or a compromise between super wide out of a synth and somewhat narrow but then adding extra effects.

some of the plugs I have that make mono into stereo are:
1. Hbasms stereoizer (FREE) This is perfectly mono compatible from 1% to 50% but doesn't work on everything.
http://hbasm.com/stereoizer.html
2. Ozone Imager (FREE) probably doesn't need an introduction
https://www.izotope.com/en/products/mas ... mager.html
3. Side Widener (Mag ware with Computer Music) also pretty good but use subtly.
4. Infected Mushroom’s Wider (FREE) it's meant to be good but always forget to try it out (I've too many f**king plugins)
https://polyversemusic.com/products/wider/
5. StereoTool v3 (FREE) by Flux (It's Flux so it's good)
https://www.flux.audio/project/stereo-tool-v3/
6. Dimension Expander by Xfer Records (maker of OTT)
https://xferrecords.com/freeware/

A1StereoControl
http://www.alexhilton.net/A1AUDIO/index ... reocontrol
Can make the low frequencies mono and widen in a Mid-Side way anything above the filter.
Although often you might want to make your sound in multiple layers so you can keep the low subs mono to begin with.
RAZ Audio - STC-3 is a similar VST

More here
https://bedroomproducersblog.com/2011/1 ... u-plugins/

The new FREE Izotope vocal doubler that came out a week ago might be a really good option but haven't used it to try and widen synths or anything yet.

And then finally you have other effects such as chorus and reverb that will widen too but I've typed enough for now hahaha

GL

CHOOS
KVRist
141 posts since 3 Nov, 2010

Re: Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

Post Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:19 pm

Sorry forgot to mention that if you do split your signal into 2 channels adding compression to both channels individually will really help even out the width too. You can go pretty extreme on the side compression) then when you sum it back you can add another compressor or limiter

perpetual3
KVRist
499 posts since 28 Sep, 2012

Re: Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

Post Fri Oct 19, 2018 2:31 pm

Extremely helpful. Thank you!

hyperbits
KVRer
8 posts since 8 Jan, 2019

Re: Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

Post Sun Jan 13, 2019 4:15 pm

If you’re into Mid-Side processing, you should definitely check out FabFilter’s Pro-Q. This is hands-down the best digital EQ you can find out there. It’s incredibly precise and full of extra features that you won’t find in other EQs.

One thing I love about this EQ is the fact that you can choose to make a certain EQ band Mid-only or Side-only, meaning only the mids or the sides will be affected.

Something that you should consider doing in all your mixes is removing the low end from your sides (up to around 200-250Hz) to keep your low end mono. This makes a mix sound much tighter and cleaner, and this definitely applies to big reverbs, since they usually contain a good deal of low end, most of which is better to reduce (with a normal low cut) and keep mono (with a mid-side EQ like Pro-Q). You can see an example of in action in this track walkthrough at 13:20: https://hyperbitsmusic.com/free/studio- ... ough-piana

Another thing that you can try with a mid-side EQ to enhance reverbs and delays (and pretty much all sounds), is to create a subtle side-only high-shelf boost, which will bring up the air in your sounds and make them sound a bit wider. This is a great strategy that you can try on all kinds of sounds (even on your master).

You can probably do these EQ moves I mentioned with the PSP e27, but I really recommend getting Pro-Q as well, since it’s an amazing tool. If you’re still on the fence, here’s a short video showing off some cool features from Pro-Q: https://hyperbitsmusic.com/fab-filter-pro-q2/

Hope this helps!

Kwurqx
KVRist
133 posts since 15 Jun, 2017

Re: Dimension/Dynamic Space/Mid-Side

Post Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:31 am

Another way to add dimension is....Delay (in 2 ways).

This is where the LEFT channel's VOLUME and/or PHASE is diferent compared to the RIGHT channel (and/or MID)

If one ear hears a sound LOUDER and/or SOONER then the other ear, the source is perceived as directional: placed more LEFT or RIGHT in space.

The LOUDER bit can be achived with a Ping Pong Delay (synced/unsynced) where the LEFT and RIGHT echoes alternate. Often there's a SPREAD option (where you can set the "panning width" of the LEFT and RIGHT signals.

The SOONER bit can be achieved by offsetting the PHASE of the LEFT a little bit (or a lot) compared tot the RIGHT. As CHOOS stated: Any Phase Offset leads to Phase Cancallation (comb filter effects). A full Phase shift of 1 of 2 channels leads to SILENCE when going MONO. But a little phase offset can allready add a sense of space.

This is the HAAS (or Precedence) effect
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precedence_effect

A combination of both can be found in the free

Voxengo - Stereo touch.
https://www.kvraudio.com/product/stereo ... by-voxengo

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