How did YOU get started in music production?

Sarah Command shares links, tips, videos and more...
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pekbro
KVRAF
2538 posts since 29 Sep, 2010 from Maui

Post Sun Apr 07, 2019 11:04 pm

I've been a musician for over 35 years, as soon as I get into music production I'll let you know.

tapper mike
KVRAF
4983 posts since 20 Jan, 2008

Re: How did YOU get started in music production?

Post Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:44 pm

I started as a radio announcer (the old kind of DJ) When I was 15. I took a class as a freshman in radio production. Got my 3rd class license with endorsement Which meant I was licensed by the FCC to run the equipment in the studio. I wore many hats at our high school radio station (WOAK 89.3) which broadcast locally in Royal Oak MI with 10 watts of mono. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_school_radio
I would pick up teletype feeds from WEXL (before we got our own teletype) and rewrite copy for news reports as well handled copy from various other sources. I also went out and did a lot of interviewing with a "professional" cassette deck recorder. (this was the 70's and we had a limited budget) Reported the news... Recorded PSA's (public service announcements) and hosted an hour long show. It was at that time I met future band mates. Brothers, one sang and the other played drums. I was intent on learning guitar so I could join them.

We wrote originals and played covers as well. All very 70's pop rock.

I started going to college to study business but I hated it. Though I did

Through and after High School I worked on several boards both recording and as a sound man. Eventually I expanded my skills to bass, dabbled in keys and experimented with early drum machines. Most notably the LinnDrum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofKyPTXt5co
And bought a 4-track cassette deck because I was really getting tired of doing sound on sound. Still I was able to kick out about 4 songs a week which took up all of my free time.

I also studied Jazz at Wayne State but dropped out in my second year.

In the 80's I went to RID to study recording engineering where I learned valuable lessons like this...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwPsQE2YDcI

After playing with the big boy toys it was disheartening to go back to my home studio of which I was quite proud of.

From there I went to Florida with the goal of saving money to go to GIT (which I never did)
I picked up gigs at local studios in the Fort Myers area on a session by session basis. It was $60 an hour and the work was always hit or miss. I never got to touch the boards but I did get to clean and calibrate the heads as well as set up rooms.
All those years even during high school I cooked for my main income. I stated to sit in on jazz and blues jams around town and tried then eventually succeeded in getting paying gigs as a studio musician. We mostly catered to commercials for local business (tire stores, pawn shops, etc) The producers rarely scored the music in notation. We'd get straight Roman Number chord charts or Nashville Number (depending on the producer) and with only slight introduction work our way through. These were always borderline copyright infringement variations of songs It was then I aquired GAS. The "right guitar look" insured the studio date. I had to work more so I could afford more guitars so I could work more. All along the work was still intermittent and I didn't stop cooking because that's what put bread on my table and a roof over my head. After 5 years I had 100 guitars. Once I finally figured out that I'd never live out my dream of being a big time studio musician making big bucks in LA..... I went back to Detroit.

Back in Detroit I was cooking and... played in a classic rock Blues band.... Hit'n'Run and cooking. Then I had the grand plan to open my own studio. Sold the lions share of my guitars. Bought way to expensive gear with money I didn't have. It bombed and I carried the debt because I was stupid about setting up a business. My master was to CD Yamaha PDS audio recorder costing $35,000 in 1990 not including all the other stuff required to transfer data and control it. People weren't interested in anything else. Now everyone is a producer :!:

Reel to Reels made way to Hard Disk recorders, and then DAWs. CD's made way for internet friendly formats. Drum Machines made way to LaunchPad Pro. Keyboards made way first to "midi guitar" then to button guitar and now to the Linnstrument. Amps changed, effects changed.
Drum machines made way for LaunchPad Pro. My standard notation reading ability has dwindled significantly enough that I'm starting from scratch and learning on the linnstrument. The only thing that has remained is Guitar GAS and cooking.

User avatar
ATS
KVRAF
6360 posts since 21 Dec, 2002 from MD USA

Re: How did YOU get started in music production?

Post Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:45 pm

decided I wanted to make music and bought Acid Pro 2 :D
my music: http://www.alexcooperusa.com
The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls ~ Pablo Picasso

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morelia
KVRAF
4409 posts since 16 May, 2002 from Brisbane , Australia

Re: How did YOU get started in music production?

Post Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:23 am

I was 4 when my parents bought me my first tennis racket. I used to jam along with Angus Young (and some other musicians who came in a distant 2nd place) on Countdown. I was only young but man I could play that thing. Later I progressed to guitar. Now, 46 years later, I'm wondering how different my life could have been if I continued with the tennis racket.
My Music >>> °morelia ° Intel Core i7 8700K, 16gb, Windows 10 Pro, Focusrite Scarlet 6i6

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ATN69
KVRAF
1915 posts since 5 Oct, 2015 from Swedish / Living in Hong Kong

Re: How did YOU get started in music production?

Post Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:33 am

Got a toy keyboard at the age of 2 and started to play my first melodies at the age of 3. My parents took notice and bought better and better keyboards for me. My very first toy keyboard was a Magnus, same as on the picture :D
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Win 10 -64bit, CPU i7-7700K, 32Gb, Focusrite 2i2, FL-studio 20, Studio One 4, Reason 10

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