Delay Time Dotted and Triplet Confusion

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I read that the proper formula for dotted notes is the full note delay time multiplied by 1.5, and for triplet, the full note delay time multiplied by .667. However, when I do this and compare my tremolo to other plugins, it doesn't match up. First, none of them have dotted whole notes, so what I have as a dotted whole note sounds more like what my reference plugin has as a dotted half note. Also, what I have as a half-note triplet sounds like a whole-note triplet on the reference plugin. However, it doesn't sound perfectly matched up and still slightly off. I'm so confused. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Well, your factors are ok, for a note with duration T you have T + T/2 for the dotted and T * 2/3 for triplet.
For the sync in your context maybe you need to see that all the elements actually use the same duration reference (E.G. 4/4 at 120 BPM) and they start at with same phase = no time offsets.

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Yeah, the tempo and time signature matter. For example, with 4/4 time every quarter note is considered a 'beat,' so if the tempo is 60 bpm, every beat is one second long. With a time signature 6/8, for example, every eighth note is a beat, so at 60 bpm every eighth note would be a second long and every quarter note would be twice that.

You can get into a bit of a gray area here in that a typical musician playing in 6/8 time is probably going to consider every three eighth notes as representing a beat, i.e. every dotted quarter note. But sticking to the strict formula of treating the denominator as the beat indicator removes any ambiguity in calculating delay time; you just want to give enough options to the user so that they can choose the note value/type that represents the beat in their context.

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Leslie Sanford wrote: Wed Jul 10, 2024 6:48 pm Yeah, the tempo and time signature matter. For example, with 4/4 time every quarter note is considered a 'beat,' so if the tempo is 60 bpm, every beat is one second long. With a time signature 6/8, for example, every eighth note is a beat, so at 60 bpm every eighth note would be a second long and every quarter note would be twice that.
The time signature doesn't matter unless you're trying to subdivide. It's all relative to BPM.

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