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Mix Analog adds Neve 1084 in Stereo

mix:analog

Mix Analog, the audio processing platform with remote control and real-time audio streaming, has added the 1084 in stereo to their selection of analog gear for mixing and mastering as a line input pass-through saturation device.

Mix: Analog comments:

We rebuilt the Neve 1084 Channel Amplifier from scratch with some of the rarest parts available used in the original vintage units, and now, you get to color and saturate your audio with it.

The 1084 is one of the most revered hardware units ever designed. It sounds like a 1073, and it gives you that beautiful neve sound thats so sought after. Introduced in 1970, this hallowed class-A, transistor mic/line amp epitomizes the beautiful "Neve sound," with open clarity, weightiness to the sound, and bite.

Now, you can run all your audio tracks of your project through the Neve 1084, compounding that effect, or even run your masters through this for spaciousness, weight, and mid-range push.

Coming to you as a line amp that lets you pass the signal through it to achieve that special neve sound, it's a simple process to use. Simply upload your audio, select it, then find the sweet spot with the "Level to Hardware" knob.

Price: The 1084 is free to use until 9th September, limited to 30 minutes per user per day. After that, the price will be 60 MAT which converts roughly to $2 depending on the purchased amount.

To use the 1084, log in at mixanalog.com and reserve a session for your desired time slot. When your time starts, you will get full remote access to the 1084 through a plugin-like web interface. Any changes are instantly applied, and the processed audio is streamed back in lossless quality. When happy with the settings, bounce the track and download the results.

Discussion

Discussion

Discussion: Active
valtekbridge
valtekbridge
21 August 2021 at 9:51pm

It's always a bit weird to me that people love the Neve units. They're fine for rock, but they're mostly just good for problem solving live recordings, imo.

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