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Ancient Solfeggio Synthesizer

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Ancient Solfeggio Tones Plugin by Ulusulu Music
Ancient Solfeggio Synthesizer
Ancient Solfeggio Synthesizer by Ulusulu Music is a Virtual Instrument Audio Plugin for Windows. It functions as a VST Plugin.
Product
Version
1.0
System Requirements
Processor: Pentium III/AMD with SSE support
Speed: 1200 MHz
Memory: 256 MB RAM
Operating system: Windows 7/Vista/2000/XP
Instrument
Formats
Copy Protection
None
Important Note
CPU intensive. No built-in effects.
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The Ancient Solfeggio Synthesizer specializes in producing an obscure scale known as the Ancient Solfeggio Tones, which are these frequencies (and their octaves):

  • 396 Hz.
  • 417 Hz.
  • 528 Hz.
  • 639 Hz.
  • 741 Hz.
  • 852 Hz.

There are 4 oscillators, each with its own ADSR, octave transposition, panning, and auto-panning controls. The A, D, and R parameters go all the way up to 20 seconds, for the purpose of making meditation music.

Made with SynthMaker

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Comments & Discussion for Ulusulu Music Ancient Solfeggio Synthesizer

Discussion
Discussion: Active
D.Josef
D.Josef
17 April 2012 at 1:57pm

From a musical standpoint, these frequencies are utter balderdash, and there is nothing ancient about them. They stem from NUMBERS that were given significance in medieval numerology, but just taking a number and deciding that it should mean cycles per second is just plain silly.

This scale sounds random and silly. About as meditational as your five year old daughter practicing on the violin for the first time in her life.

Hear the "C major chord" in this "tuning system" at 2:12 in this vid, and listen to the reasoning. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfftTrmhhzo

lexplexus
lexplexus
18 January 2013 at 6:07am

The Perfect Fourth occurs (with integer-ratio precision) twice, a very strong argument for the 'cycles-per-second' interpretation of the numbers. If some octave transposition is applied along with some pleasant sound-shaping, the tones are very meditative. I've been getting very encouraging responses from audiences. If a "major chord" sound is desired, it can be found be sounding the tones Re, Mi and La simultaneously.

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