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How do i convert guitar tabs to piano keys?

How to make that sound...

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Peachey
KVRist
 
262 posts since 13 Jun, 2009

Postby Peachey; Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:09 am How do i convert guitar tabs to piano keys?

Hey guys i am trying to make a remix to Muse's Uprising and i want to put in the solo and some other bits from the guitar but i have no idea of how to make the guitar tab pitch's on the piano keys.

If you get what im saying can you please help me?!?!

Cheers.
Tijl
KVRist
 
144 posts since 28 Feb, 2008

Postby Tijl; Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:59 am

Just look at it as a guitar being 6 pianorolls;

If for example your tab has a 5 on the lowest string (which is the E string normally) then you start counting 0=E 1=F 2=F# 3=G 4=G# 5=A so you're piano note is an A etc etc (the tuning for a guitar is E A D G B E for the other strings btw

OR; download guitar pro, load in the tab, convert it to midi and you're basicaly done :p
seppesantens
KVRist
 
31 posts since 13 Nov, 2006

Postby seppesantens; Wed Oct 28, 2009 2:55 am

you also might want to take a look at this:

http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/piano/
allcentury
KVRian
 
602 posts since 9 Dec, 2004

Postby allcentury; Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:21 am

i've owned an account with: 8notes.com for a while. they will convert, it's about $12 a yr. else you can do it by hand but for my line of work, it made sense to pay for the software
geroyannis
KVRAF
 
2073 posts since 1 Apr, 2004, from Athens, Greece

Postby geroyannis; Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:32 am

Tijl wrote:OR; download guitar pro, load in the tab, convert it to midi and you're basicaly done :p

That's what I would do. But instead of guitar pro I would download TuxGuitar which is free open source. It's an awesome program that does exactly what Guitar Pro does, and of course it opens tabs made in Guitar Pro.
jcrisman
KVRist
 
357 posts since 15 Aug, 2009

Postby jcrisman; Mon Mar 01, 2010 2:46 pm

geroyannis wrote:
Tijl wrote:OR; download guitar pro, load in the tab, convert it to midi and you're basicaly done :p

That's what I would do. But instead of guitar pro I would download TuxGuitar which is free open source. It's an awesome program that does exactly what Guitar Pro does, and of course it opens tabs made in Guitar Pro.


I just discovered TuxGuitar recently and I like it. One can enter either standard music notation, tablature, click notes on a fretboard, or even click from the chord options. It's GNU/Linux and can be used on Windows and Apple computers.

I use it to import MIDI, add a blank measure in front of the piece, and then export MIDI to Garageband where I will delete the first beat of the blank measure (which usually has MIDI patch selections commands) so that I can use different instruments.
Pengman
KVRer
 
1 post since 4 Dec, 2012, from Chippenham, UK

Postby Pengman; Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:43 am

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Try using the convertor at http://guitartabs2notes.cleverpages.co.uk (http://guitartabs2notes.cleverpages.co.uk)
Currently this converts guitar chord shapes in the format x23332 or similar into notes on a treble stave and will also name the notes for you if you ask it to. Other stuff in the pipeline includes the conversion of linear tabs in the format ---5--- etc and displaying the lower 2 or 3 notes on a bass stave.
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