The good & the bad customer service.

Anything about MUSIC but doesn't fit into the forums above.
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jancivil
KVRAF
17949 posts since 20 Oct, 2007 from No Location

Post Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:48 am

Yeah, I bought a Novation controller thingy at the same time I bought Cubase 5. It didn't work for Cubase 5 and they were pretty much 'too bad', rather dismissive; the workaround didn't work, I was SOL. Shit happens. I maybe could have checked for compatibility in the first place.

tapper mike
KVRAF
4985 posts since 20 Jan, 2008

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Tue Mar 19, 2019 6:55 am

I'll say this without reservation.

Roger Linn is amazing.
I had an issue with a usb port that wasn't sending enough electricity to my linstrument. As a result the linnstrument wouldn't properly power up on any usb port or the 9v. RL who was on vacation during Christmas in another continent came to my rescue and instructed me on how to get it going again. The linnstrument was off of the warranty and I couldn't afford shipping let alone a bench. In minutes it was up and running.

And just recently. I decided to make use of the Bitwig version that RLD provides in the package. I'd lost all the accompanying documentation. Roger Linn responded to my email in less than an hour and provided all the info I needed.

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Aloysius
KVRAF
23214 posts since 11 Aug, 2008 from a computer

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:16 am

RL. Finally got a refund out of him some years ago. Which goes to show that even the service provided by the same person can be inconsistent.
Broccoli is murder.

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Deep Purple
KVRian
1109 posts since 9 Jan, 2015 from NY, NY

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Wed Mar 20, 2019 5:05 pm

<Pedantic Mode>@OP - you used the word "there" in place of "their" multiple times</Pedantic Mode>
Sweet child in time...

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Hink
Rad Grandad
28297 posts since 6 Sep, 2003 from Downeast Maine

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Wed Mar 20, 2019 7:37 pm

ayuh, cant get they-ah from here-yah

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIJBUZm1HoY

edit: hah...it mentions my town...bucksport...that's bert and I, I bought those albums for my dad at xmas when I was a kid and that is pretty much what it sounds like 'round these parts
Albert Einstein may have been a genius but his brother Frank was a monster

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Bombadil
KVRAF
3180 posts since 31 Aug, 2013 from Far From the Twisted Reach of Crazy Sorrow

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:28 am

I've never had too many issues with stuff I've bought online. I've had more issues with shady brick and mortar music shops than anything else.

Last year, I bought a VOX AC15H B-Stock, marked as showing 'slight traces of use.' The reverb was DOA. When I called Thomann to complain, I was told that they'd send me a new replacement...with a 2.5% discount for my trouble and their misrepresentation (arranging a DHL pickup, the thing was too heavy to cart to the post office). I got really pissed, and sent them an email threatening to never buy anything from them again. I've spent many thousands of €€€€s there over the last 14 years. One of their customer reps got back to me and gave me a new unit for the B-Stock price. So, can't complain too loudly over that.

I've had IK support not get back to me about some issue or other. I do not foresee buying much from them in the future.

Recently, I had an issue with not being able to download a tutorial from MacProVideo. Customer support, despite being in Vancouver, 9 hours behind me, got back to me immediately and solved the problem. Further, the tutorial in question was about how to do something in Logic 9, though the parameters in LPX are different. Christian helped me sort out that specific issue right away.

So, not too much to complain about, thankfully.
“We're an Anarcho-Syndicalist commune”
Dennis

User avatar
sin night
KVRian
1226 posts since 1 Aug, 2006 from Italy

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:08 pm

tapper mike wrote:
Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:43 am
Having been a former support technician and supervisor.

It really depends on the commitment of the guy in charge. It's hard to find competent techs with programming knowledge who want to be techs. In smaller operations this can be handed off to software developers who have little patience or interpretive skills. It's the last thing they want to do so they brush it off as long as they can.

In larger operations support is shuffled off to third party companies that work off of scripts (India) They never vary from the script, They may not fully understand the issue at hand and as a result when something doesn't go right they go back to the beginning of the script and start from there.

It takes a lot of hand holding for a manager to work things through with tech in support. Especially due to the misconception by the general public that being an arsehat is the only way to communicate or just a form of fun. And it's a delicate balance for the tech to when explaining the difficulties a given caller is providing.
This.

I work for a consultancy firm and I'm part of a team providing technical support (= fixing bugs) on the software we make for a very big customer (our final users are the employees of that customer). Everything is done here in Italy (both the our customer and us are italian), so the situation is handled better than having a third party support company working somewhere else in the world... but it's still not an easy task.

We, developers, have a different mindset than our customers, so sometimes they do things we don't expect, or they explain the issues in a way which is not clear for us (they often don't provide some details, they take things for granted...). It's nobody's fault, it's just a different background...

Sometimes it takes a good effort (and some creativity) on our end to understand how to reproduce an issue. And this of course has an impact on the resolution time.


Also, this job is not so nice. It's good to learn what you must not do as a programmer (so you get your code right at the first time), but it's frustrating fixing someone else's mistakes, and trying to do it fast.
You may write just a few lines of code in a week and spend the rest of the time testing, debugging... it's not really what a developer dreams (in fact, my employer decided this was/is my task, it's not something I asked for). I have a few years of experience at support tasks and I'm quite good at it, but sometimes I miss doing "proper" development (= creating new functions). Actually, I know some people were openly unhappy when they were moved from the development team to our support team.

The skillset in a support position is a bit different than development, it takes some time to learn (but it's useful when/if you go back to a development team) and, in my experience, it's not taught at school.
It's not easy to have a good support team; developing something new is easier (especially if you know there's someone else fixing your bugs later on... :-P :roll: )



From a customer perspective, I think it's good to learn to have all the details at hand before calling the technical support. Being precise at explaining the issue, providing as much details as possible from the start... I think this pays both for the customer and the support team, it makes the whole process more straighforward.


Just my 2 cents, of course!

mike_the_ranger
KVRist
141 posts since 16 Feb, 2017

Re: The good & the bad customer service.

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:15 pm

FabFilter was very kind and quick and has sent me an intermediate version of a plugin like an hour later.
Melda support was meh since pretty much the only response was that it must be a bug in all daws, but never their fault.
IKMM well pretty much standardized responses.
Vengeance slow and very short answers. Felt not like I was a worth customer to them.
Native Instruments never replied to me :D

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