blues Improvisation

Chords, scales, harmony, melody, etc.
jambo222
KVRer
5 posts since 2 Jul, 2014

Post Mon Feb 25, 2019 12:32 am

HI
I like to play blues Improvisation on some bars.
I am use a7 d7 e7 chords ( 1 , 4 , 5 frame )
the note of this chord is :
A7= A C# E G
D7 = D F# A C
E7 = E G# B D
tha A pentatonic scale containing = A , C , D, EB , E , G . NOTES
C# , F# , G# , B from the chords not part of the A pentatonic scale
My question is : if I able to use C# , F# , G# , B notes When I Improvise blues ?

I am sorry abut my bad English

Thanks

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jancivil
KVRAF
17906 posts since 20 Oct, 2007 from No Location

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:45 am

Sure, but there will be ways not to use them and ways to make it work.

F# is the neighbor to the normative flat 7 of your A basis. You can bend it into G, you can think of it as a tension and the answer is E as well.
G# is the more problematic of the 'out' notes for a blues, probably it standing alone sticks out like a sore thumb in context, so you'd use it in a run chromatically between G and A.

The tension between the minor 3rd C and major 3rd C# is a feature, not a bug.

B may be part of your major pentatonic, or in a minor feel it has a kind of modal quality which might be doing too much or too 'jazz' if you're being 'pure'. It's all context.
Listen and take notes, transcribe solos which speak to you and draw your own inferences and conclusions, though.

jambo222
KVRer
5 posts since 2 Jul, 2014

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:10 pm

Thanks
it is boring to play only frome the scale, i fill like robot thet use only black and white Color .
now i can change and add more notes/Colors to bluse liks.

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jancivil
KVRAF
17906 posts since 20 Oct, 2007 from No Location

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:41 am

scales aren't really where it's at

c1c2
KVRist
164 posts since 12 Jan, 2005 from Germany

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:20 pm

jambo222 wrote:
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:10 pm
i can change and add more notes/Colors to bluse liks.
In fact you can add any note you like as long as it "sounds" good.
Minor pentatonic on major blues "works".
Sliding in from the minor to the major third sounds cool.

The more notes you add the more you get away from classic licks.
Sounds that you need to if you feel bored.
Me personally I am more and more studying classic blues licks.
In fact I find them quite tricky sometimes. :ud:

MadBrain
KVRian
950 posts since 1 Dec, 2004

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 8:44 am

Yes. One classic trick is that you can switch between the Major blues A scale (A B C C# E F#) and the minor blues A scale (A C D D# E G). Some people use A blues major on A7 and A blues minor on D7.

You can also use the E major blues scale (E F# G G# B C#) over the E7 chord, and also the E minor blues scale over the same chord (E G A A# B D). And you can use the D major blues scale (D E F F# A B) and the D minor blues scale (D F G G# A C) over the D7 chord. Along with using G#, F and Bb as passage notes between G-A, E-F# and A-B respectively, I think that covers basically every note 8)

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jancivil
KVRAF
17906 posts since 20 Oct, 2007 from No Location

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:54 pm

or you could play blues ;)

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donkey tugger
Boss Lovin' DR
5488 posts since 15 Mar, 2002 from the grimness of yorkshire

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:31 pm

jancivil wrote:
Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:54 pm
or you could play blues ;)
:lol:

Very true..the clue' is in the thread title..

As Henry Rollins sung, "don't think about it..do it". Now I'm a terrible lead guitarist, but even I can sometimes pull something vaguely impressive out of the bag if I stop trying to think where the sausage fingers should go, and just go for it..

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jancivil
KVRAF
17906 posts since 20 Oct, 2007 from No Location

Re: blues Improvisation

Post Fri Mar 22, 2019 7:19 am

Well, you can't think and play at the same time (Sonny Rollins).

"blues major scale" - honestly I have never had that notion (nor heard anyone suggest it) in my life.

'in A', B C C#. You might wanna do that... I really think a blues m.o. is gestures, licks if you will for certain changes of climate. B C C# rolls into the 3rd of A major. It may just bend into it.
What I don't think is going to be the real m.o. for a blues is to have a scale in mind as a start. That one excludes G, in A, in order to be 'major scale' type. It seems dogmatic a bit.

In the moment, you may want a feel or mood; and you may want to consider the climate, the chord.
in A, I considered the G# as the more "out"; however when you go to E, V, it's the 3rd of the chord.
But what is the meaning of your choice? What is your idea, what is the moment about?
You want to think melodically. Scales ≠ melody.

What does 'B' mean in an A blues fabric when it's not a neighbor (cf., in a raga, there are moves you do and don't do, compositionally; a note may always be strictly relegated to a grace. It's about the mood. There might be a real idea running a minor scale! There might not.)? There's a certain mood if you hang on it for a bit. It might be doing too much to.

Dig an Albert King solo some time, learn by examples.

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