Noise canceling headphones for making music?

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KVRAF
12647 posts since 8 Mar, 2005 from Utrecht, Holland

Post Fri May 15, 2020 1:53 am

AdvancedFollower wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 1:27 am
[...] However it's certainly possible to reduce background noise like conversations, TV etc. to the point where it's not distracting, even when nothing is playing in your headphones.
"Not distracting" is kinda subjective. The office I work(ed) in happily, is too noisy and distracting for some of my colleagues.

Technical data sheets are worth a read. You get them from the horses mouth, not from the web shops.

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Model        Acoustical Isolation
----------   ----------------
DT 770 Pro   ca 18 dBA
DT 770 M     ca 35 dBA
Since the Peltor earmuffs were enough to give me "near silence" [...]
Interesting... I just looked up some Peltor ear muff specs (listed at the website of 3M if you dig deep enough) and they vary in the same range as the earphones we compared: from just 18 dB up to over 30. So it really depends on which model you have.

As said, I own the DT 770 "M", and if nothing comes in through the wire, you hear the environment muffled. If environmental sound was at 80 dB SPL, it would now be 45 dB SPL. Only sounds below 35 dB SPL (background sound in a library will be total silence) go down to 0 dB hence are silent. It's a big difference with the "Pro" which attennuate by 18 dB (rustling leaves will be silent again)

To get an idea of how loud any dB SPL number is, read up here: https://www.iacacoustics.com/blog-full/ ... evels.html

You'd have to compare cans side by side. Personal preferences and expectations also play a big role.
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KVRist
124 posts since 24 Apr, 2019

Post Fri May 15, 2020 4:02 am

I have major issues with paper-thin walls and neighbour noise, and we're all stuck at home. My brother sent me a pair of Sony WH-1000XM3 and they're fantastic for turning off the upstairs neighbour's TV and the voices leaking through from downstairs, but I can't seem to get used to them for music production. Still using a pair of open-back Sennheisers for that (HD 598), despite the situation. But this new wave of Sony noise-cancelling tech has me impressed all the same, and I can watch TV in a bubble to destress at least.

Not sure what the more neutral options are, but that's my experience anyway. You're not the only one ;)

KVRer
1 posts since 17 Feb, 2021

Post Wed Feb 17, 2021 6:01 am

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AdvancedFollower wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 1:27 am
BertKoor wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 9:39 am
> you can still hear everything slightly muffled when no sounds are playing.

If this is your issue, then nothing will help I'm afraid. Laws of physics...
Well of course it's impossible to physically block out *all* noise since you can't exactly wear the equivalent of a soundproofed room around your head (it would weigh hundreds of kg and crush your skull with pressure). However it's certainly possible to reduce background noise like conversations, TV etc. to the point where it's not distracting, even when nothing is playing in your headphones. The regular DT-770's didn't do that, however. They were enough to block out the noise of computer fans etc. almost completely, but beyond that, other noises were just slightly muffled.

Since the Peltor earmuffs were enough to give me "near silence", adding isolating in-ears would only improve the isolation. Unfortunately my SE215's are too large to fit comfortably inside the cups, but the much smaller Etymotics should easily fit.
Agree with you that if we want to get the absolute silence we must put our head in something like anechoic chamber https://silencewiki.com/info/worlds-qui ... c-chamber/ (https://silencewiki.com/info/worlds-quietest-room-anechoic-chamber/). I have used different headphones but they can't reduce all noise and I have stress. But I have not used Peltor. Can you really recommend them to use? Because sometimes I have to go to my country house and work in silence but with awful internet.

KVRAF
8273 posts since 16 Aug, 2006

Post Sat Feb 27, 2021 8:20 am

elxsound wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:56 am
fese wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:07 am
I don’t know what type of noise you’d want to cancel out, but if it’s other people and other people talking, you’re going to be a bit disappointed. You’ll still hear them.

I have the Sony WM1000XM3, they’re ok, they work well on e.g. a train ride, not so much in a noisy office (well, better than nothing, and depends on how loud you listen). I got them for 230€.
You can configure a “not-so-bass-heavy”-Profile, but they don’t sound anywhere as good as my Beyer DT880, which were cheaper. I don’t regret buying them, but I wouldn’t use them for music production (only if I had nothing else).
I have the Sony WM1000XM2, and they actually work great for reducing the volume people talking... making it sound like a neighbor with TV next door/with semi-thin walls. I've had noise cancelling headphones before, which were great only for white noise cancellation, but people's voices could be heard very easily. With the Wm1000XM2, these are great at just cancelling it all out. I sometimes just put them on simply to get break.

I also use the Sony WF1000XM3 for when I was on the trains (but f**k that life with COVID19 now) and they're not as effective (for music production, due to a bluetooth only connection), but are still great.

There is only latency IF you are using a bluetooth connection. Plug that shit in, or don't use them.

If you are using your headphones on a laptop, or desktop and if you are agreeable to spending more money on top of the cost of the headphones, consider buying Sonarworks Reference 4 (headphone edition)... this is often on sale, so no need to pay the full price. There are profiles for most consumer grade noise cancelling headphones getting you closer to a balanced output.

Still, if using these... just like when using closed backs, just be hyper aware of bass/ear fatigue. Its very easy to not notice this and end up raising the volume of the bass. In this setting, I keep the volume low but just loud enough that I only hear what I'm working on.
I have the XM2's as well and I also think they do a very good job cancelling voices. There are some settings in the app which control the amount of reduction. When I was still going into the office, they were a Godsend when needing to concentrate and get work done over noisy neighbors. You'd hear muffled talking in between songs, but with music playing, it was a non issue. Love them. And as pointed out above, the XM2's allow for a wired connection.

Another nice thing: there is a Reference profile for them to balance out the frequency response. I'm sure there are going to be some drawbacks, probably if live tracking and trying to monitor, but I'd recommend them.

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KVRAF
5729 posts since 31 Aug, 2013 from Far From the Twisted Reach of Crazy Sorrow

Post Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:44 pm

I have Sony WF1000XM3s. Last I tried, they were useless for tracking or mixing due to latency. Good cans, though.
"In this world, you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."
Elwood P. Dowd

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KVRAF
6375 posts since 18 Aug, 2007 from NYC

Post Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:47 pm

Bombadil wrote:
Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:44 pm
I have Sony WF1000XM3s. Last I tried, they were useless for tracking or mixing due to latency. Good cans, though.
Even when plugged in?

With a Bluetooth connection there's crazy latency, but not when plugged in (and with noise cancelling engaged).

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KVRAF
5729 posts since 31 Aug, 2013 from Far From the Twisted Reach of Crazy Sorrow

Post Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:54 pm

Didn't try them plugged in. Thought it would be defeating the purpose.... :hihi: :P
"In this world, you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."
Elwood P. Dowd

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