The linux DAW thread

Configure and optimize you computer for Audio.
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glokraw
KVRAF
8839 posts since 6 Oct, 2004

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 3:10 am

@audiojunkie: Thanks for the details and links regarding usb gear! I'm sure many will happily come across them in search engine results in coming years. :hyper:
Knowledge has a good shelf-life 8)

3lu5iv3
KVRian
618 posts since 24 Sep, 2016

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:00 am

i decided to use Reaper as my DAW but i can't choose my OS.
should i use Arch, Gentoo, Void, Kiss, Bedrock, Guix, Nix?
which OS is best for Reaper?
Last edited by 3lu5iv3 on Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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"I believe every music producer inherently has something unique about the way they make music. They just have to identify what makes them different, and develop it" - Max Martin

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farlukar
KVRAF
7182 posts since 18 Apr, 2004

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:01 am

The one you like the most.

3lu5iv3
KVRian
618 posts since 24 Sep, 2016

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:04 am

farlukar wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:01 am The one you like the most.
thanks farlukar
SoundCloud
"I believe every music producer inherently has something unique about the way they make music. They just have to identify what makes them different, and develop it" - Max Martin

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farlukar
KVRAF
7182 posts since 18 Apr, 2004

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:16 am

It really doesn't matter. Reaper does not depend on package managers or the latest of the latest libraries, so it'll run fine on any distro that's not ancient.

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GaryG
KVRAF
7458 posts since 13 Jan, 2003 from Darkest Kent, UK

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:57 am

Thanks glokraw & audiojunkie

Strangely I found a pen drive with an older version of avlinux on it this morning, just tried to boot it and, after numerous bios changes, got slapped with Bitlocker recovery code requests. Guess Windows doesn't like sharing it's drives. :)

I'll download the latest edition and do it properly (have a spare 256GB ssd somewhere).

Cheers.

glokraw
KVRAF
8839 posts since 6 Oct, 2004

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:45 pm

farlukar wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:16 am It really doesn't matter. Reaper does not depend on package managers or the latest of the latest libraries, so it'll run fine on any distro that's not ancient.
There are some things customized and configured in Avlinux, that will matter even to Reaper users,
as well as to those quite new to linux, or using linux for audio for the first time.

The pajackconnect setup makes all the audio bits available without editing text files, so someone
can use an instrument in Reaper to accompany a favorite song on youtube or spotify etc and edit the results. Then compose full pieces for adding to cloud based musicians accounts etc.

It also has wine and the yabridge plugin wrapper (with a nice gui), so most windows plugins will be available for use once you establish plugin paths in wine, and input them in yabridge:

yabridgectl -add /home/rising-star/.wine/drive_c/users/VstPlugins

yabridgectl -add /home/rising-star/.wine/drive_c/"Program Files/VstPlugins"

yabridgectl sync

When yabridge is finished, have Reaper do a plugin clear-cache-rescan

AVLinux also has many custom goodies from the MX Linux crew, for easing the more mundane computer chores. To me, a fully supported and functional 'record button' is the best feature a linux distro can offer to musicians. :hyper:
Cheers

User avatar
audiojunkie
KVRAF
3834 posts since 19 Apr, 2002 from Utah

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:51 pm

3lu5iv3 wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:00 am i decided to use Reaper as my DAW but i can't choose my OS.
should i use Arch, Gentoo, Void, Kiss, Bedrock, Guix, Nix?
which OS is best for Reaper?
Reaper is designed to work on all distros. What distro would be best for you is a very personal thing that depends on many factors:

How much actual linux experience do you have? How much time do you plan to spend solely on maintaining the OS (not just using it)? Do you prefer the newest software even if it has bugs that may break your system, or do you prefer reliable software, even if the update curve is two years behind the newest software? Do you prefer corporate controlled development, or an independent community driven development? Do you have a desktop environment preference?

If you don’t have much Linux experience, or any strong opinions, or don’t have a strong preference, my recommendation is AVLinux or Ubuntu Studio or Ubuntu. If you do have opinions regarding the above things I listed, then the distro I would recommend would depend on those opinions.

This is an oversimplification, but in general:
Arch based distros are rolling distros that get the latest software as fast as it is available. They require more work and sometimes some manual intervention to keep them running, but they are light-weight, fast, and bleeding edge. Debian based distros run behind the development of rolling distros. They still get updated, but new software is released after extensive testing (approximately every two years), and are generally proven to require little maintenance and manual intervention. These distros are for those who want systems that are stable and break less. Everything else is somewhere in between these two points.

Most developers currently compile for Ubuntu first, because it has the largest market share. It is also focused on ease of use. For users new to Linux but not wanting everything already done for them, Ubuntu is a great place to start learning. Turn key systems that have everything already prepared for you are even easier. AVLinux and Ubuntu Studio are examples of this.

For me, after distro hopping from one distro to another and trying everything from Ubuntu to Arch, I have currently settled on Fedora. Fedora is a middle ground between rolling based and version (point-based) releases. It’s leading edge without being bleeding edge. It doesn’t require a lot of manual intervention. The beauty of it all is that everyone is different, and there’s a distro out there for everyone.
C/R, dongles & other intrusive copy protection equals less-control & more-hassle for consumers. Company gone-can’t authorize. Limit to # of auths. Instability-ie PACE. Forced internet auths. THE HONEST ARE HASSLED, NOT THE PIRATES.

lobanov
KVRian
593 posts since 7 Oct, 2005

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 6:07 pm

3lu5iv3 wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:00 am i decided to use Reaper as my DAW but i can't choose my OS.
should i use Arch, Gentoo, Void, Kiss, Bedrock, Guix, Nix?
which OS is best for Reaper?
Yes, it's possible to use any distro.

But some specialized distros (like AVLinux) offer tuned kernels (that is variants of the core operating system optimized and dedicated for audio). So less latency etc. If you need these things go this way.

Another factor is availability of specialised repositories. If I'm not wrong KXStudio offers programs and plugins for Debian and Ubuntu based distros. This is a simplest way. But in many cases you can install plugins and programs from common reps or from developers' sites. AVLinux has many apps preinstalled.

Choosing a distro is one of the most puzzling goals in Linux world. You're never sure if your choice was right and the best one. "One version OSes" (Win, Mac) are devoid of this drawback.

EDIT: Also think about support and the history of distro. How long does it exist? How large is community? Etc. I find no sense to use one of 'little' distributions. Nothing is guaranteed.

glokraw
KVRAF
8839 posts since 6 Oct, 2004

Post Sat Feb 04, 2023 9:45 pm

"Little distros" is an interesting phrase, whether referring to the byte size of the default installation, the distros generally accepted number of users, the stated purpose and reach of a distro, or whether it is a reduced size spinoff from the likes of Debian, Suse, Ubuntu, RedHat, Arch etc.

There are quite a few distros which are both successful and 'little', as described above, and there are also examples of bloated 4 gig shovel-ware distros that some people really like, despite the hundreds of apps and libs that will likely go unused in the short term.

I think there are quite a few middle-ground distros that are often the best choice for new users, who want a fully operational system covering the base range of computer tasks, without being overwhelmed by many unfamiliar choices. And also good for more advanced users who would rather pick and choose their own clutter.

I have several CD sized "little" distros, whose purposes vary from realtime audio, to usefulness on old computers, to home-security, to graphic arts, to system rescue & configuration.

I am happy to have a wide and growing range of options, even if they are challenging to describe and portray in public places.
Cheers

3lu5iv3
KVRian
618 posts since 24 Sep, 2016

Post Mon Feb 06, 2023 1:48 am

audiojunkie wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:51 pm
3lu5iv3 wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:00 am i decided to use Reaper as my DAW but i can't choose my OS.
should i use Arch, Gentoo, Void, Kiss, Bedrock, Guix, Nix?
which OS is best for Reaper?
Reaper is designed to work on all distros. What distro would be best for you is a very personal thing that depends on many factors:

How much actual linux experience do you have? How much time do you plan to spend solely on maintaining the OS (not just using it)? Do you prefer the newest software even if it has bugs that may break your system, or do you prefer reliable software, even if the update curve is two years behind the newest software? Do you prefer corporate controlled development, or an independent community driven development? Do you have a desktop environment preference?

If you don’t have much Linux experience, or any strong opinions, or don’t have a strong preference, my recommendation is AVLinux or Ubuntu Studio or Ubuntu. If you do have opinions regarding the above things I listed, then the distro I would recommend would depend on those opinions.

This is an oversimplification, but in general:
Arch based distros are rolling distros that get the latest software as fast as it is available. They require more work and sometimes some manual intervention to keep them running, but they are light-weight, fast, and bleeding edge. Debian based distros run behind the development of rolling distros. They still get updated, but new software is released after extensive testing (approximately every two years), and are generally proven to require little maintenance and manual intervention. These distros are for those who want systems that are stable and break less. Everything else is somewhere in between these two points.

Most developers currently compile for Ubuntu first, because it has the largest market share. It is also focused on ease of use. For users new to Linux but not wanting everything already done for them, Ubuntu is a great place to start learning. Turn key systems that have everything already prepared for you are even easier. AVLinux and Ubuntu Studio are examples of this.

For me, after distro hopping from one distro to another and trying everything from Ubuntu to Arch, I have currently settled on Fedora. Fedora is a middle ground between rolling based and version (point-based) releases. It’s leading edge without being bleeding edge. It doesn’t require a lot of manual intervention. The beauty of it all is that everyone is different, and there’s a distro out there for everyone.
thanks for the detailed explanation.
SoundCloud
"I believe every music producer inherently has something unique about the way they make music. They just have to identify what makes them different, and develop it" - Max Martin

3lu5iv3
KVRian
618 posts since 24 Sep, 2016

Post Mon Feb 06, 2023 1:49 am

lobanov wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 6:07 pm
3lu5iv3 wrote: Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:00 am i decided to use Reaper as my DAW but i can't choose my OS.
should i use Arch, Gentoo, Void, Kiss, Bedrock, Guix, Nix?
which OS is best for Reaper?
Yes, it's possible to use any distro.

But some specialized distros (like AVLinux) offer tuned kernels (that is variants of the core operating system optimized and dedicated for audio). So less latency etc. If you need these things go this way.

Another factor is availability of specialised repositories. If I'm not wrong KXStudio offers programs and plugins for Debian and Ubuntu based distros. This is a simplest way. But in many cases you can install plugins and programs from common reps or from developers' sites. AVLinux has many apps preinstalled.

Choosing a distro is one of the most puzzling goals in Linux world. You're never sure if your choice was right and the best one. "One version OSes" (Win, Mac) are devoid of this drawback.

EDIT: Also think about support and the history of distro. How long does it exist? How large is community? Etc. I find no sense to use one of 'little' distributions. Nothing is guaranteed.
yeah, ditto. how large the community is really important, thanks.
SoundCloud
"I believe every music producer inherently has something unique about the way they make music. They just have to identify what makes them different, and develop it" - Max Martin

glokraw
KVRAF
8839 posts since 6 Oct, 2004

Post Wed Feb 08, 2023 10:50 pm

The windows and Mac communities are pretty large, so there are many sub-communities within them. Each probably much larger than any group of individual linux distro users.

Not including kvr, I post sometimes in four linux community forums, but only two on a weekly basis.
I refer to them far more often than I post, to learn capabilities, solve issues and keep up with the news. Time is short, so the quality of the content/knowledge shared by community members far outweighs the number of members. In general, I'd say linux community members need to provide more in-depth answers, that will cover future queries from the search engines. Still,I've gleaned most of my setup choices and workflow from very small communities populated by very bright members.
Cheers

Trancit
KVRAF
3906 posts since 27 Jul, 2004

Post Thu Feb 09, 2023 2:40 am

I am a complete Linux noob but I nonetheless installed a dual system with my current Windows and Ubuntu...
This wasn´t a big problem so far and Ubuntu is running fine... scaling to 150% for my 4k monitor...etc...

First problem I discovered: I don´t understand at all the file system of Linux...
Where do things get installed resp. where do I find user settings like in windows i.e. in "Roaming" and "Local"??
For native Linux apps... how can I define where they get installed??

Second drawback was this script I tried to install... https://github.com/brendaningram/linux- ... l-audio.sh
which the creator claims in this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cG6ipmOyfw0
would install everything on Ubuntu (and others) to get go with Audio...

After installing this script and rebooting I got error messages while booting that kvm-amd (or perhaps "kms-amd??) would be blocked by the BIOS and Ubuntu started in some kind of safe mode with graphics set to 1080x720 (4:3) without any option to change this...

I had to reinstall Ubuntu again to get everything running again...

I am a little bit afraid that Linux is too nerdy for me... when I see videos people using all these text based commands I don´t understand at all...where do you get these commands from??? How did you know about managing this??

glokraw
KVRAF
8839 posts since 6 Oct, 2004

Post Thu Feb 09, 2023 2:29 pm

Hi, package manager tools like synaptic handle placement of new linux files system parts.
Wine will create a .wine folder for all the windows structures, with links to linux folders for things like Documents, Downloads etc.

/usr folder is a bit like like "Program Files", holding many subfolders, like /usr/bin for apps,
and /usr/lib for system libs, /usr/share for icons, presets, sundries related to the apps

/etc holds many configuration files

I'll post more tonight...gotta run

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