recommend a (printed) book for learning C++ please

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KVRAF
2473 posts since 13 Mar, 2004

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:04 am

I'm currently learning C++ and work through various online tutorials.
My last more intensive encounter with 'programming' was in C64 BASIC, so I'd consider myself a total beginner more or less.

Doing the online tutorials works ok (currently learning about definition and calling of functions) but sometimes it's also nice to not having to learn in front of the computer so I'm also looking for a printed C++ book.

Is there something like 'the reference C++ book' which anybody used to learn or what would you recommend ?

Thanks.

KVRian
1265 posts since 24 May, 2004

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:07 am

I used C++ Primer Plus by Stephen Prata. It's really good because he tackles many many common programming issues along the way that you'll encounter with any programming language.

The "reference" is of course The C++ Programming Language. But people don't really recommend it for beginners.

KVRAF

Topic Starter

2473 posts since 13 Mar, 2004

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:17 am

Thanks, appreciated.
I'll look into these.

KVRian
626 posts since 29 Jul, 2003 from Paris - France

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:41 am

here's the ones I have on my bookshelf about C++:
"The C++ Programming Language"
"Effective C++"
"More Effective C++"
"Effective STL"
"C++ coding standards"
"Modern C++ design"
"C++ template meta programming"

The last ones are not really for beginners but, even if you're not a hardcore C++ programmer, its important from a cultural perspective to know about the existence of advanced programming techniques.

And make yourself (and others that will read your code) a favour: read "C++ coding standards". I highly recommend it for starting with good coding habits, it makes your code more readable and help avoid common programming errors.

KVRist
333 posts since 30 Jan, 2005 from New Zealand

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 1:00 pm

"Coder to Developer" - for those who don't know the difference.

User avatar
stw
KVRist
129 posts since 12 Mar, 2005

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 1:19 pm

If you're a beginner maybe this is a good starter:
http://www.amazon.com/Sams-Teach-Yourse ... 0672327112

I once found a online pdf version.
Google for it and see if it fits your needs.

Mr Entertainment
12209 posts since 30 Apr, 2002 from i might peeramid

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 1:21 pm

hermann schildt, "c++ for beginners"

nice in text, free as pdfs from microsoft
you come and go, you come and go. amitabha neither a follower nor a leader be tagore "where roads are made i lose my way" where there is certainty, consideration is absent.

KVRer
9 posts since 28 Oct, 2009

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 6:46 pm

From the creator of C++ :
http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Princ ... 321543726/

Then read books, papers & articles by myers, sutter, or alexandrescu.

KVRAF
1936 posts since 16 Aug, 2004 from Vienna, Austria

Post Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:39 pm

xoxos wrote:hermann schildt, "c++ for beginners"
That's Herbert Schildt 8-), and unfortunately the book isn't available from Microsoft any more:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/beginner/cc305129.aspx

But the Internet doesn't forget... google "C++ A Beginner's Guide" .pdf

I learned it from Bjarne Stroustrup's original work "The C++ Programming Language" in 1989. Below 300 pages at that time, IIRC 8-) The current >1000-page epos still has good credits.
"Until you spread your wings, you'll have no idea how far you can walk." Image

KVRAF

Topic Starter

2473 posts since 13 Mar, 2004

Post Fri Mar 30, 2012 6:49 am

Thanks for the other suggestions also.

I now went with 'C++ Primer Plus' as it looked quite good (imo) from the preview.
Also thanks for the hints about the pdf's... :)

User avatar
KVRist
415 posts since 13 Mar, 2009

Post Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:06 am

No_Use wrote:I'm currently learning C++ and work through various online tutorials.
My last more intensive encounter with 'programming' was in C64 BASIC, so I'd consider myself a total beginner more or less.

Doing the online tutorials works ok (currently learning about definition and calling of functions) but sometimes it's also nice to not having to learn in front of the computer so I'm also looking for a printed C++ book.

Is there something like 'the reference C++ book' which anybody used to learn or what would you recommend ?

Thanks.
Make life easy for yourself and read this first!

http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/

Then move on to more detailed reference books etc.

Well, that would be my advice for a beginner.

Stephen

Mr Entertainment
12209 posts since 30 Apr, 2002 from i might peeramid

Post Fri Mar 30, 2012 4:32 pm

arakula wrote:
xoxos wrote:hermann schildt, "c++ for beginners"
That's Herbert Schildt 8-)
reality falls short of the ideal :p :)
you come and go, you come and go. amitabha neither a follower nor a leader be tagore "where roads are made i lose my way" where there is certainty, consideration is absent.

KVRAF
7075 posts since 17 Feb, 2005

Post Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:20 pm

C++ for dummies!!!

KVRer
19 posts since 21 Feb, 2006

Post Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:51 pm

audiospillage wrote:
No_Use wrote:I'm currently learning C++ and work through various online tutorials.
My last more intensive encounter with 'programming' was in C64 BASIC, so I'd consider myself a total beginner more or less.

Doing the online tutorials works ok (currently learning about definition and calling of functions) but sometimes it's also nice to not having to learn in front of the computer so I'm also looking for a printed C++ book.

Is there something like 'the reference C++ book' which anybody used to learn or what would you recommend ?

Thanks.
Make life easy for yourself and read this first!

http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/

Then move on to more detailed reference books etc.

Well, that would be my advice for a beginner.

Stephen
+1 for this excellent resource!

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