West Coast Whistle

How to make that sound...
CircuitTree
KVRist
37 posts since 27 Nov, 2018

Post Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:41 am

I believe the infamous west coast whistle was made with a sine wave on a Moog model D but I still cannot replicate it on my Moog vst.

For reference, the patch is in this song starts at 2:26 https://youtu.be/NxDO8PipeBw?t=146

If anyone knows how to make it, I'd greatly appreciate it!

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BertKoor
KVRAF
10874 posts since 8 Mar, 2005 from Utrecht, Holland

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:10 am

We are the KVR collective. Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated. Image
My MusicCalc is back online!!

Kwurqx
KVRist
135 posts since 15 Jun, 2017

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Wed Nov 28, 2018 3:42 am

CircuitTree wrote:
Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:41 am
I believe the infamous west coast whistle was made with a sine wave on a Moog model D but I still cannot replicate it on my Moog vst.

If anyone knows how to make it, I'd greatly appreciate it!
Generally this sort of fluty stuff is based on a Triangle (or Square) oscillator(s). Not just a sine.

The spectrum of Sine is/contains just a single partial. Triangle and Square contain all odd ranked partials. Where a Triangle is sort of a lowpass filtered Square. Partial amplitudes for a Triangle are 1/rank^2 (rank squared). For Square it's 1/rank. So a Square contains much more energy in the higher frequencies/partials then a Triangle.

You don't need many partials to emulate a flute. So use a (resonant) Lowpass filter to get the "richness" / "dullness" / character you want to achive.

See FFT for info in partials/spectrum.

Kwurqx
KVRist
135 posts since 15 Jun, 2017

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:47 pm

And in the very high frequencies, especially on the higher ptches/notes, it sounds like an extra layer of (white) noise through a high resonance (nearly selfoscillating) filter.

Music Bird
KVRist
112 posts since 23 Apr, 2017 from Eastern US

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:20 pm

Also, many tracks used sawtooth waves too. So using a sawtooth wave monophonically in the highest key and using portamento, pitch bends, and mod.
That’s a square wave with a filter envelope at full resonance, have no idea what keyboard it is. It sounds like an SH-101 or ARP Odyssey. It clearly has a 2-pole filter type sound to it, so that could help.
MIDI keyboard, FL Studio, Casio, Yamaha and Korg, free and FL VSTs.
Other: guitar, tin whistle, slide whistle, toy percussion, pellet drum, log drum, harmonicas, recorders, and kazoos.

CHOOS
KVRist
142 posts since 3 Nov, 2010

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:35 pm


Rastkovic
KVRist
35 posts since 26 Jul, 2018 from North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:49 pm

CircuitTree wrote:
Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:41 am
If anyone knows how to make it, I'd greatly appreciate it!
Especially this example sounds like a triangle, not a sine wave....
::keep calm, and make great sounds

Kwurqx
KVRist
135 posts since 15 Jun, 2017

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:10 am

CircuitTree wrote:
Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:41 am
I believe the infamous west coast whistle was made with a sine wave on a Moog model D but I still cannot replicate it on my Moog vst.
...
If anyone knows how to make it, I'd greatly appreciate it!
I guess we've got all the ingredients now. The actual fluty sound can be emulated by many subtractive synths. As long as it also has mono/portamento with some control over portamento rate/time. The video link CHOOS posted shows an example the actual workflow and usage (though the sound in the walkthrough is a bit different, the principle stands).

CircuitTree
KVRist
37 posts since 27 Nov, 2018

Re: West Coast Whistle

Post Thu Dec 13, 2018 8:42 am

Kwurqx wrote:
Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:10 am
CircuitTree wrote:
Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:41 am
I believe the infamous west coast whistle was made with a sine wave on a Moog model D but I still cannot replicate it on my Moog vst.
...
If anyone knows how to make it, I'd greatly appreciate it!
Awesome, I’m gonna try to recreate this on the Legend vst by Synapse!
I guess we've got all the ingredients now. The actual fluty sound can be emulated by many subtractive synths. As long as it also has mono/portamento with some control over portamento rate/time. The video link CHOOS posted shows an example the actual workflow and usage (though the sound in the walkthrough is a bit different, the principle stands).

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