Pro-audio for film/video on Linux?

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There are many threads on KVR that discuss audio-for-video/film on Linux, but usually restricted to one program. I am hoping to put together a thread where people can post and update what they use as more companies offer solutions. While there are some free/libre options, they tend to be limited, proprietary ones are Davinci Resolve (studio), Lightworks (now accepts Linux audio plugin options), Reaper (great video import /export options), Harrison Mixbus (had issues importing video). One of the main gaps on audio for film/video on Linux are a lack of plugin options, specifically for noise repair. For that, I go to Windows where there are a lot more options such as iZotope or Spectra Layers Pro. Why go to Linux at all? It is a more stable platform, has a better file system (ext4 is superior to NTFS) and less bloat, for starters. Anyone care to weigh in on pro-audio for film/video on Linux, what they use and other options I may not have mentioned?

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Just to start, here's a list of what we've found that works on all three OSs.
I personally feel that for Linux, the versions incorporating Flatpack with CLAP is headed the best.
viewtopic.php?t=573248

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Just to start, here's a list of what we've found that works on all three OSs.
I personally feel that for Linux, the versions incorporating Flatpack with CLAP is headed the best.
viewtopic.php?t=573248
@BBFG This seems a bit too broad and not many deal with post for audio. Options are limited for now, hopefully that will change. Not a fan of Flatpack myself. Thanks, though.

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fathomstory wrote: Sun Feb 18, 2024 10:43 am
Just to start, here's a list of what we've found that works on all three OSs.
I personally feel that for Linux, the versions incorporating Flatpack with CLAP is headed the best.
viewtopic.php?t=573248
@BBFG This seems a bit too broad and not many deal with post for audio. Options are limited for now, hopefully that will change. Not a fan of Flatpack myself. Thanks, though.
Can I ask why you're not a fan of flatpack? Seems to me it's biggest advantage is to unify installation across all the distros. What else should I know?
I'm also wondering what distro(s) you use and if they are server based?

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Can I ask why you're not a fan of flatpack? Seems to me it's biggest advantage is to unify installation across all the distros. What else should I know? I'm also wondering what distro(s) you use and if they are server based?
@BBFG Hogging the hard drive space and wondering WTF I can't use my machine anymore because something ate my / drive really pisses me off. Reminds me of Windows. I tend to have generous space for / drives. I prefer using distro package managers or when devs release a program with install specific to distro. However, programs like Ardour and Mixbus can run on almost any distro with their script. Now if flatpak is the *only* way to get some cool post production software to run on linux, ok. I'm in but it is my least favourite option. Maybe flatpak is an emerging tech and will consume less space and resources over time, but am not a fan. For multimedia post, I will use whatever distro the proprietary graphics drivers devs tell me to.

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fathomstory wrote: Sat Feb 17, 2024 3:19 pm Anyone care to weigh in on pro-audio for film/video on Linux, what they use and other options I may not have mentioned?
There was a series of Purism blog articles from Gardiner Bryant using Kdenlive:

Video Editing on Linux Featuring Librem 14 – Purism

The most relevant post is part 5, where Gardiner uses Audacity:

Video Editing with Linux: The Most Important Part of a Video – Purism

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OP, can you better define "pro audio for film/video" because it is an open-ended topic, even if you are just trying to assemble a list of Linux software that can be used. Towards what end?

Once you add the word pro, the spectrum of goals there ranges from hanging out an audio post shingle and taking whatever jobs you can hustle up -- which means interoperability and knowing how to handle the workflow coming & going with the most common NLEs and the defacto interchange formats: OMF, AAF and such -- down to narrow focusing on your own "pro[fessional]" caliber projects, where interop and file exchange are less dictated by your customer base than by your own choices.

In the former you are taking on jobs from other professionals. In the latter you are trying to generate professional level content from within your own projects. What I'm getting at is the same problem any mixing or mastering engineer faces the moment they start working on other people's projects, which is catering to the needs of customers. If you are hustling customers, and keeping them happy, a lot of choices are thrust upon you and Linux would at best be a small part of the toolchain. OTOH, if you are your only customer, a lot of choices can be crammed down without a second thought, and Linux could be more central.

I would add that film & video are one of the most collaborative artforms out there because no one person can do every job, not unless you move the bar for "pro" down to include tiktok influencers. And unless the rest of the team is comfortable with the choices you make about Linux, you are still subject to file interchange with editors, vfx, color grading, and other such tasks.

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Reaper can do alot A/V wise. Not sure I would say Pro but can definitely produce quality results.
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Problem with Reaper, last I checked, was lack of support for OMF or AAF, which, depending on one's needs, can be a show stopper.

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Not sure why one has to absolutely pick a single program for both audio and video. Most programs, even if they support both audio or video tend to lean towards one or the other.

Leaning towards video (with audio support), Davinci Resolve (which you mentioned) provides full on pro level video. Match up with your preferred DAW, and I would imagine that would cover your needs.

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@kidslow I have done video/audio for small business and non-profits since 2013, for money. Now bigger projects cross my table that do indeed require (more) assistance from others including mixing, colorgrade, graphics, music score and so on. Sorry to be so shallow, but a teacher once advised that if you are being paid for your work, than you are a pro. However much a pro is up for debate. Now I do not get paid a lot, so I cannot afford the OSX ecosystem. I generally dualboot between Linux and WindowsOS. However, I have had ongoing issues with WindowsOS, like files playing 'hide and seek', hard drive mounting issues, stability among other problems not present in Linux. I am told the really big film studios use Linux, and with good reason. Currently, I have Reaper, Harrison Mixbus, and DaVinci Resolve Studio on the Linux side of things. I have used Lightworks, on Linux, for a year, it is a good program but awkward (it is mostly keyboard based) for someone trained on Adobe CC. I may give Lightworks another try because of recent interesting improvements. At this juncture, for collaboration, things seem to work out. People send the files I receive. However, I do have to hold my nose and go to WindowsOS to run specialty programs like audio repair or Topaz labs.

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@fathomstory, who said you needed MacOS? All I said was it's very difficult to be a "pro" using only Linux, which you have reinforced. It sounds as if you are a professional. Congratulations, but keep in mind that small business and non-profits are not exactly stalwarts of post-production and probably very flexible with deliverables. I am sure the big film studios use everything. So what. AFAIK, Linux is used in render farms by entities like WETA. Most editing and post will be done on Avid, Adobe, and Blackmagic software and someone who wants to interoperate with these tools will either have them installed or some way to deliver and receive inputs and outputs they require. That was my main point.

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@kidslow It is my ongoing dream to never have to boot into WindowsOS, again. Though the big studios have Linux, they also have the engineers to get all software running smooth on that platform. Linux is not without it's problems. I neglected to mention, 'Plugins', (that you would want to use on post for audio) there are not a lot of options for audio plugins that run native on Linux, but some are Applied Computer Music Technologies Ltd (ACMT), and the Mixbus plugins. Though it is the latter that received poor reviews by the likes of AdmiralBumblebee. A libre option I hear great things about are Linux Studio Plugins ( lsp-plug.in ) . I have not tried ACMT yet, will have to save up for that. There isn't really the range of plugins that are available for Windows in audio. While I heard you can run said plugins and a Windows version of Reaper on Linux via WINE, I have yet to successfully get access to said plugins, like my Tokyo Dawn of DDMF stuff.

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