Log InCreate An Account
  1. Plugins
  2. »
  3. u-he
  4. »
  5. Satin
  6. »
  7. Reviews

Satin

 My KVR
Tape Simulator Plugin by u-he

Satin has an average user rating of 4.00 from 1 review

Rate & Review Satin

User Reviews by KVR Members for Satin

Reviewed By Rah [read all by] on September 16th, 2013
Version reviewed: 1.0 on Windows.
Last edited by Rah on 12th August 2014.

Satin, for me, is what some people call a 'game changer'.

I've been trying to achieve a satisfying approximation of an analogue/hardware sound with an entirely software setup for a while, without much success.

There was a lot of pre-hype/buzz around Satin, and I (sceptic that I am) wasn't holding my breath. But I heard what the demo did to my sounds and had to have it

I find it can comfortably replace many other individual plugins that I've been chaining together in an attempt to get the sound I want; Eq, compressors, limiters, clippers, saturators etc. Using Satin massively reduces the amount of fiddling about I need to get those thick, juicy, present tones I've been craving.

For me, this is 'it'; This is VST software that has cracked it; enough that I don't crave expensive hardware anymore.

It's not a budget plugin. In fact it's the most expensive effect plugin I've purchased so far, even at the intro price. However, I think it's worth it in spades.

Comments & Discussion for u-he Satin

Discussion
Discussion: Active
eyelife17
eyelife17
8 May 2014 at 1:21pm

Alchemist as multicompressor ...do I plug in u-he satin before flux alchemist or after as the final step to master the track. Thank you.

sascha
sascha
8 May 2014 at 7:49pm

It depends. If you want the 'tape' texture or signature to be printed into the audio (of course, just in subtle amounts on the master), then Satin could be the last stage.

But typically, a tape device would be before a (multi-band) compressor. This can come very handy, since tape can easily tame transients and occasional overly harsh peak sections. This way, a succeeding dynamics device doesn't have to 'work' that hard, meaning its incoming signal is already 'prepared' in some way, more even and predictable.

Krakatau
Krakatau
8 May 2014 at 8:06pm

@sasha ...interesting tip and good to know.

Please log in to join the discussion