Log InCreate An Account
  1. Plugins
  2. »
  3. User Reviews

Product Reviews by KVR Members

All reviews by Starship Krupa

Review Something or Find Reviews

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on October 25th, 2020
Version reviewed: 2020.09 on Windows

First I'd like to say that I'm grateful to BandLab for rescuing this DAW. I only started using it after the first BandLab version, so my impressions are those of someone who has only known it in its Cakewalk By BandLab form. I don't think things could have worked out better for the existing user base and new users looking for a professional DAW whose workflow and layout are much-imitated industry standards.

At this point, 3 years since the Cakewalk company dissolved and BandLab acquired its intellectual property, it's no longer accurate to say "Cakewalk by BandLab is Cakewalk SONAR with a new name." That would be like saying Studio One 5 is Studio One 4 with a new name. If Cakewalk did versioning, it would surely be up to Cakewalk by BandLab 2 or 2.5 at this point..

Cakewalk (the DAW) began life as a rebranded update to SONAR, but since then, there have been so many changes. While preserving the old SONAR workflow for people who had gotten used to it, the developers have added new features great and small. The small features are usually ones requested by the user base, many of whom participate in the very active and helpful Cakewalk by BandLab forum.

The larger features include such additions as an Arranger Track and MIDI Articulation mapping (just released in their Early Access Program).

The developers have also been relentlessly improving the DAW's stability and tuning the audio and screen rendering subsystems. This has resulted in CbB becoming not just more stable, but faster and less taxing of system resources. I can run it no sweat on a 10-year-old Dell notebook when I want to use it away from home.

As for this program with its 33-year history, the first things I fell in love with were its mixing console view and its silky, rich sounding playback engine. I've yet to see an audio routing task that I couldn't accomplish with Cakewalk's mixer, and the graphics are the most attractive I've seen in a DAW.

In 2018 when I first tried it, I initially had some trouble with comping/editing. As I experienced it it steered the user too forcefully toward using its advanced tools at the expense of more traditional, copying, pasting, dragging and trimming. This has since been remedied with the strategic addition of a couple of options that better permit the user to jump in and start editing/comping using a more basic workflow while allowing the user to learn the more advanced techniques at their own pace. Which I recommend, if you have straightforward comping to do, you can fly with Speed Comping. Just be sure to switch tools before working in a more traditional fashion.

Because of the strength of its mixer and comping, it makes a great companion for Ableton Live, which is such a strong compositional tool, but is weaker in pure multitrack audio recording, comping, routing, and mastering. Ableton Live! and other programs may be connected via ReWire. There is nothing requiring you to edit, mix and master using the same DAW you use for recording and composition, and it is an easy matter to export your tracks from one DAW and use Cakewalk for mixing.

A big strong point for me and others who love to customize their tools is the comprehensive Cakewalk Theme Editor, which allows end users to set colors and replace bitmapped artwork throughout the program. There are many excellent user-created themes available for download in the aforementioned forum.

And for heaven's sake, my favorite feature is the free subscription license! This not only substantially decreases the necessary investment required to have access to a top-tier mature DAW, but it has other less apparent benefits. Specifically, the BandLab developers' only mandate is to increase the quality of the product, and no priority is given to new features at the expense of basic functionality. With payware programs that rely on new and upgrade license purchases to sustain the company, the first mandate will always be to focus programming and testing resources on the introduction of new features that are more likely to make new users want to buy it and existing users pay for the upgrades.

BandLab is a large, diversified company that owns multiple music publications, guitar brands, and musical accessory brands. Cakewalk (along with their Android, iOS, and browser-based DAW's) is a project they support to promote music-making and increase brand awareness. It earns its keep as a free prestige promotional item, and this means that the developers are much more free to create a quality bug-free product that shows off the company's sense of excellence.

How many times have you wished that the developers of your favorite program would fix existing bugs rather than coming up with flashy new features that you aren't going to use? Well, Cakewalk under BandLab's stewardship is just that.

Only 4 stars because there are some areas of the program that need attention. When a program has been around this long, under so many different management teams, it's inevitable that some features will get more resources than others. It's also likely that a feature added in 1997 and one added in 2020 will have inconsistencies in look and feel.This can slow down learning different features. Having acknowledged that, once I learned how to record and enter both audio and MIDI, and then edit what I had created, the rest is just....icing on the cake (sorry).

Although it comes with enough audio plug-ins to create excellent mixes (you could do it using only the ProChannel modules in the console if you wanted), it's a bring-your-own-plug-in affair when it comes to virtual instruments. There is a General MIDI instrument that can be tweaked to sound pretty good with some of its instruments. Since you are reading this on KVR, you will be aware that this is easily remedied via the vast collection of freeware now available. If you want synths, many excellent mature instruments are available from such companies as AIR (Hybrid, xPand!, Vacuum Pro) and iZotope (Iris, Break Tweaker) for a fraction of their original licensing fees if you watch for promotions. Newcomers like W.A. Production and SoundSpot are also great at filling out the instrument collection.

I do admit a fondness for the (included with sampled electric piano and drum kit as an extra download) Cakewalk Studio Instruments String Section as a quick tool for sketching string arrangements.

I've been using the program as my primary DAW for 2 1/2 years and it's so rich, so deep in features, that I'm still learning what I can do with it. The (separate download) PDF manual is over 1,700 pages long, and few of those pages are redundant.

-Erik "Starship Krupa" Miller.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on June 25th, 2019
Version reviewed: 1.0 on Windows

Nice little ROMpler collection of 25 long slow ambient pads.

Has the standard ADSR and that's it.

If you want to do some ambient soundscapes, and get there quick, Padspheres is worth a look.

If you want to build your own unique sounds, go elsewhere.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on April 24th, 2019
Version reviewed: 12.12 on Windows.
Last edited by Starship Krupa on 24th April 2019.

This is the compressor I used to really learn how to use a compressor, and it is still a go-to years later.

What makes it such a great compressor for learning and everyday use?

First, the graphic display is a really good depiction of what the compressor is doing, making it easy to visualize the settings as the user dials them in. And when first learning to use a compressor, despite the bleats of "use your ears, man" from the p-nis gallery, I found it very helpful to use the other senses I have available.

Compression can be a subtle thing at first, until one tunes one's ears to be able to hear what it's doing, the actual effect of attack and release times, ratio, threshold, all that. The graphic on MCompressor shows you just what it's doing.

There's also a time graph you can access, but I rarely use it.

The thing's also incredibly versatile, and I'm not even going to qualify that with "for a freebie," because it's way more versatile than most other compressor plug-ins on the market. You can set the RMS length of the detector all the way to peak, set the knee to hard, soft, or linear, and in soft mode, set just how much knee you get.

With such versatile settings of the detector, you can imitate the response of an opto, VCA, FET, etc.

It's great for side-chaining from another channel.

After using it for years and not using it for side-chaining I also discovered that when I pressed "Enable" on the Side-Chain bar, it also enabled high-pass and low-pass pre-filters for the detector, which is great for when you're using it on a drum bus and don't want every kick hit and cymbal crash to pump the compressor.

If I were restricted to using no compressor plug-in but MCompressor (and no EQ but MEqualizer), I could do a respectable job of mixing a song. It might take longer, and it might not sound as slick as it would if I could use my whole goodie bag, but I could get it done.

Download the Free Bundle, use it for free, register it for $49.00 or wait for Meldaproduction to put it on sale for $25.00. It's a bargain at any of those prices. MCompressor alone is a $50 plug-in. To get to use it for free is just nuts.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on September 13th, 2018
Version reviewed: 1.2 on Windows

This is a truly amazing tool for doing evolving ambient and rhythmic soundscapes. I give it only 3 stars at this point due to the idiosyncrasy of its only taking input from the computer keyboard and not responding to MIDI input.

Yes, it's good that the host program can record the keystrokes, but it really limits things like being able to use alternative controllers, especially for live, and improvisational use. I would love to be able to set my nanoKONTROL up to talk to this thing.

Also, there are plenty of other things I do with my keyboard that I do not want a synth plug-in responding to.

Please, if possible, set this amazing synth up to respond to MIDI input.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on August 8th, 2018
Version reviewed: 2.0.3 on Windows

This is my favorite currently available reverb plug-in.

It has everything I want in a good algorithmic reverb, including a nice EQ section. I've tried others but I keep going back to Denis' very wonderful creation.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on April 27th, 2018
Version reviewed: 1.0 on Windows

Not this crap again.

RDG Audio love to put their "free sample players" up here because they show up on KVR in the free listing, but after you go to their site, you will see that it is only the player that is free. You don't get any actual sounds without forking over money.

I don't understand why they feel the need to do this. The actual free products of theirs that I have downloaded were of high quality and I have no reason to doubt that their pay products are worthy of consideration on their own terms.

It's not as if people who are interested in free instrument plug-ins are going to be fooled by it. My suspicion is they'll just be as annoyed as I was when they find out the deception.

I would give zero stars because the "player" is useless, but KVR's lowest rating is a single star.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on December 19th, 2017
Version reviewed: 1 on Windows

I have to give this a "1" rating, which may seem kind of harsh for a "free" VSTi. However, I think that this has earned it by failing to even reach the lowest bar that an instrument can reach: it makes no sound at all.

Apparently the developer had a flash of marketing genius and realized that plug-ins that were marketed as "Free" got more traffic and views on KVR, so they split this keyboard sitar into two parts, the "Player," which they let you download freely, and the "Expansion Pack," which contains the soundware, for which you must pay them $49. This is not "expansion" in the sense that the Player does something without it and the Expansion Pack lets you do more, the Expansion Pack only lets you use the instrument at all. Without it the Player just sits there on the screen with a banner telling you to buy the Expansion Pack.

I can only wonder what percentage of people, having been lured in by interest in a free sitar VSTi, and then going to the trouble of downloading what they think is a lite or demo one, then finding out it is neither, will then want to shell out 50 bucks for a full-priced one from the same site. My guess is that it would be a very small percentage, but then nobody is said to have gone broke overestimating the stupidity of the public.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on October 5th, 2017
Version reviewed: 11.05 on Windows

This free bundle is just insanely great. What MeldaProduction is giving away for free is hundreds of dollars worth of processing.

The compressor alone is a fantastic tool, it is the one that taught me the most about how to set up a compressor to do what I want it to.

The analyzers are essential tools in my studio as is the equalizer.

I don't use all of them, but some of them I use on every single project I create.

With the $50 registration, you get among other things, upsampling, which is a worthwhile feature. Also, it helps out the developer, who is doing the recording world a great favor by putting these out for free.

The pitch corrector, for heaven's sake, is great to have, and it will do the Cher/T-Pain as well as more subtle correction.

They are all so feature rich that I have used some of them for years without realizing their full potential.

Bottom line: go get them now.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on August 6th, 2017
Version reviewed: 3.0 on Windows

I use it on every project as the fader on my Master bus. Essential for the smooth fader, metering and RMS peak detection.

Reviewed By Starship Krupa [read all by] on April 1st, 2017
Version reviewed: 1.0 on Windows

Do yourself a favor and try the only freeware dbx compressor emulation around.

This is a truly amazing compressor, the one that has most helped me grasp what good compressors are capable of. I can make my vocals float 6" in front of the rest of the mix with it.

If it were available in a 64-bit build, I would need no other track compressor. As it is, I am scrambling to try to get close to this one using MCompressor and ReaComp.

The included presets are obscurely named, and their output is set to greater than unity, but that is not unheard of in the plug-in scene.

Kudos, many thanks to De la Mancha for creating such a great piece of software in the first place, and then releasing it as freeware.

FEATURED
33% Off
SOUND FORGE Audio Studio 15Audio Editing
by MAGIX
 $39.00
Add A Review My KVR
Was $59.00; Save $20.00 until 30 Sep 2021
KVR Readers' Choice Awards 2021 - Nominations Announced - Vote NowA Sound History – Touring VSL's Synchron StageKVR Developer Challenge 2021 - Winners Announced