Best resynthesis instrument?

VST, AU, AAX, etc. plug-in Virtual Instruments discussion
KVRAF
5719 posts since 15 Sep, 2005 from East Coast of the USA

Post Tue Nov 19, 2019 4:46 pm

carrieres wrote:
Mon Nov 18, 2019 1:30 am
Loom II ?
Can it do resynthesis of samples? If so, I should check it out. :)

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KVRAF
2202 posts since 12 May, 2004 from Oxford, UK

Post Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:56 am

Arturia's Synclavier II does resynthesis - I've had some good results but mainly bad ones - not really sure why.

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fmr
KVRAF
10006 posts since 16 Mar, 2003 from Porto - Portugal

Post Fri Nov 22, 2019 4:21 am

ChamomileShark wrote:
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:56 am
Arturia's Synclavier II does resynthesis - I've had some good results but mainly bad ones - not really sure why.
You have to carefully define the nodes after the analysis (how many and where are they placed). It's not a set-and-go process. You can get very good results, but it takes time and work (and knowledge about the audio).
Fernando (FMR)

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KVRAF
2202 posts since 12 May, 2004 from Oxford, UK

Post Fri Nov 22, 2019 4:45 am

yes, I'd read that. I found a post by someone who had done some vocal resynthesis on the original hardware as well as the software and he shared tips re node placement and using the auto-tune.

Curiously I think I got good results myself on a vocal phrase and I think it was a sample of a Santur. Bad results with a gong. Maybe that's down to all the inharmonics? But I thought there was something else that failed - can't remember now. The hardware Synclavier resynthesis disks show it can be done though! (they are available for import to Synclavier V on FB from Cameron Jones).

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KVRAF
1807 posts since 10 Apr, 2002 from Poissy, France

Post Fri Nov 22, 2019 4:47 am

Examigan wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 4:46 pm
carrieres wrote:
Mon Nov 18, 2019 1:30 am
Loom II ?
Can it do resynthesis of samples? If so, I should check it out. :)
i don't know but you can load two waves, there are talking about vocoder, but the user guide is not enough detailled imho
Image

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KVRAF
1807 posts since 10 Apr, 2002 from Poissy, France

Post Fri Apr 30, 2021 12:18 am

This video show resynthesis inside Loom II :
https://youtu.be/SCujIf5eJ2w?t=583
Image

KVRist
109 posts since 22 Aug, 2005

Post Wed May 05, 2021 7:29 pm

For what its worth, if you still have it laying around on your shelf, Cakewalk's Rapture Does a very nice resynthesis of samples, and yes, Harmor is still a favorite as well.

KVRist
33 posts since 16 Jan, 2006

Post Fri May 07, 2021 12:03 am

How many kinds of resynthesis are there- granular, wavetable, additive, spectral? what are their differences? What are they most useful for?
I seem to remember years back a kind of holy grail of resynthesis being to be able to eg enter a just a few (piano, vocal, flute, etc) samples of an instrument at a few different velocities and pitches and interpolate between them so as to create a realistic playable instrument? Has any progress been made here?

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KVRAF
1807 posts since 10 Apr, 2002 from Poissy, France

Post Fri May 07, 2021 12:11 am

stevebard wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 12:03 am
How many kinds of resynthesis are there- granular, wavetable, additive, spectral? what are their differences? What are they most useful for?
I seem to remember years back a kind of holy grail of resynthesis being to be able to eg enter a just a few (piano, vocal, flute, etc) samples of an instrument at a few different velocities and pitches and interpolate between them so as to create a realistic playable instrument? Has any progress been made here?
Steve, you should create a new topic with your question as subject, you will have a lot more answers
Image

KVRist
33 posts since 16 Jan, 2006

Post Fri May 07, 2021 12:45 am

Hi Carrieres- I saw my questions as an expanding, unpacking of the original post, but thanks for you suggestion. I may follow it if I don't get much joy here :-)

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KVRAF
2202 posts since 12 May, 2004 from Oxford, UK

Post Fri May 07, 2021 1:18 am

stevebard wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 12:03 am
How many kinds of resynthesis are there- granular, wavetable, additive, spectral? what are their differences? What are they most useful for?
I seem to remember years back a kind of holy grail of resynthesis being to be able to eg enter a just a few (piano, vocal, flute, etc) samples of an instrument at a few different velocities and pitches and interpolate between them so as to create a realistic playable instrument? Has any progress been made here?
For me it's just the spectral which might use additive. Re the Holy Grail, I remember that in the 70s it was to be able to take the sound of a piano, stretch, pitch and more importantly change the harmonic structure. So for me, granular and wavetable aren't resynthesis.

KVRist
33 posts since 16 Jan, 2006

Post Fri May 07, 2021 2:21 am

My understanding of this area is very basic but in a sense isn't it re-synthesis when you sample a sound and it sounds just like a straightforward recording of the original sound but actually in being brought into your sampler it's been split up in one of its dimensions (eg time or spectrum) and only apparently been put back together again so that you can manipulate its 'secret' divisions in a way you can't with a standard sample. In this sense wouldn't granular and wavetable qualify as re-synthesis?

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KVRAF
32501 posts since 14 Sep, 2002 from In teh net

Post Fri May 07, 2021 2:38 am

I don't think so with wavetables because you are still dealing with whole samples, just strung together into a wavetable (except in the case of those wavetable synths that can create wavetables additively - maybe some of them can do resynthesis - apparently Parawave can for example)

With granular yes afaik (I am no expert) you can do a form of resynthesis - I know that the Roland V-Synth has been described as having granular resynthesis capabilities, and this article confirms that you can use granular this way, but I would expect the results would not be as well defined or smooth as with high quality additive resynthesis

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques ... -synthesis

KVRian
633 posts since 29 Oct, 2015 from Jupiter 8

Post Fri May 07, 2021 3:01 am

never really used granular as i never found good use for it, but to my understanding granular in it's principle basically is “just“ sample playback.
it just focuses on very small snippets and may have one or two tricks your regular sampler might lack or is not as good or fast for such “microscopic dissections“.
Synthesis can be anything anyway. Back in the 80's at least here in Germany samplers were called sampling synthesizers too.
“People pay good money for old stuff because they mistakenly think that the gear has more to do with the products than it actually did. And because it makes them feel good to own it.“ wise man on GS

KVRist
38 posts since 20 Mar, 2016

Post Sun May 09, 2021 2:51 am

This is a good overview of the options for spectral resynthesis using Alchemy and Logic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-3atLSbUlM

-Dan
Windows/Mac | Studio One, Live, Logic | Push 2, Maschine MKIII, Atom SQ | Presonus Quantum 2, Focusrite Scarlett 2i4, | Fender, Godin, Taylor

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